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  • PHOTOGRAPHY AND REALITY | IN CONVERSATION WITH YPATIA KORNAROU

    INTERVIEW March 3, 2023 PHOTOGRAPHY AND REALITY BODY NO BODY Photography by Ypatia Kornarou Interview by Karen Ghostlaw Pomarico We have the pleasure of introducing a photographer with a unique and innovative way of visual storytelling. Ypatia Kornarou was born in Athens, Greece, where she lives and creates her photography today. Ypatia has been inspired and drawn to artistic photography since she launched her career in the photographic world. While participating in international and domestic photography festivals, Ypatia finds valuable time to write articles presenting photographic material in the magazine “Photonet”. Ypatia explores her ideologies, choosing the photography of theatrical and dance performances to translate and communicate her stories. “In my evolution, the moment when thoughts and feelings came, I felt ready to communicate, creating photographic projects.” Last year Ypatia became actively involved in social media, especially on Instagram, where important international photography communities continue to support her and present her photographic work. Ypatia explains her visual translation process. “Photography taught me to ask myself which is the reality, where it is and whether it exists. Quite early on I undid the illusion that I was photographing reality. So, I started studying the frame and my aim was to understand the content. I concluded in endless ascertainments. Sometimes I turned them inside and some other times outside. In time I realized that everything I allowed to enter in my field of vision was the 'signified' of my existence. The composition of a photograph is everything that is absent or existing in the soul of a photographer at the moment of the 'click'. A picture cannot exist if it has nothing to say and the photographer exists because she can communicate pictures. In this point there exists a tiny deception from the picture’s view: ‘it promises reality’ just like it happens in illusive love when ‘it promises the ideal’. The photographer does not use words, she has the frame for communication. She does not possess reality, not even her own reality but, for sure, she is contained in what she imprints with the camera. Every shooting is a search, only that the dive happens mainly in the unconscious.” Several times Ypatia’s thoughts on photography have been hosted along with photos of her, on important sites (“Photologio”, “Nexus Media”, “Lifetone”, “PolisMagazino”). From 2009 until today she photographs Theater and Dance Festival (“Young Artists – The 12 Coupes”, “Contemporary Dance-Compartments Dance Project” at “Train in Rouf”). She recently transmitted her knowledge in to photography seminars organized by art schools or places of creation and art (Tabula Rasa, Orneraki School, Compass Theater, and Spring People). Ypatia has been gracious enough to share with our readers on The Pictorial List, a new series of photographs from her project: BODY NO BODY. Ypatia explains her intentions and concepts that have driven this intimate series. “BODY NO BODY draws its inspiration from the daily life of modern lifestyle in western culture, where the approach mainly focuses on satisfying the social expectations and meeting material needs. The nudity in the photographs represent consciousness and the consequences we accept due to the fulfillment of social conventions. The body of a modern person carries the requirements of a “social normality”, thus excluding its own “bare reality”. The mental state is housed in a neglected body where the satisfaction of emotional needs is at stake. Humanity seems to be in a constant negotiation for its existence. Interpersonal relationships are hovering in space created by the lack of meaningful communication.” IN CONVERSATION WITH YPATIA KORNAROU THE PICTORIAL LIST: Hello Ypatia, please tell us about yourself. What would you say first drew you to photography? YPATIA KORNAROU: I was born and raised in Athens, the capital of Greece, where I still live to this day. I first studied accounting and then I worked for several years in this profession. I fell in love with photography during my childhood, when I discovered a water gun shaped like a camera. I was only nine years old. Later, during my young years, when the dilemma between photography or studies in economics arose, logic prevailed. I chose a secure professional future. Then, an unexpected health issue arose that prompted me to return to the things I really love. Of course, the first one was photography. TPL: Your photography is intriguing, thought provoking. How would you describe your photography to our readers, and tell them what you are trying to achieve artistically? Describe your creative and critical thinking process for us. YK: First of all, I would like to thank you for the beautiful comments you made about my photography. My artistic approach is mainly based on the process of self-therapeutic introspection that takes place during the creation of photography inspirations. I cannot deny, however, that I would like the viewers to be able to meet parts of themselves in my work, and at the same time to dive deep into their inner identity. TPL: What inspires your unique visual storytelling? Where do you find your inspiration to create? What importance does storytelling or key themes hold for you? YK: The narration in a shot is of utmost importance for the dynamic of visual communication. We can say that it is essentially a “gift” that the visual field possesses since words are absent. I put a lot of emphasis on narration, because I feel the need to narrate but also because I have the desire for someone to be there to understand. This is how I try to channel my words, through visual recording. Their truth. So, because I believe in the identity of the work, I draw inspiration mainly from the way I perceive the world and myself. If we accept that everything is potentially an inspiration. Where we will focus is the timing of an indiscernible attraction. The theme of inspiration includes everything that art means. An artist can only be a creator when they are inspired. Anything mistaken for imitation is not the artist’s personal confession, therefore it is not their truth. So, because I believe in the identity of the work, I draw inspiration mainly from the way I perceive the world and myself. TPL: We all have influencers and people that inspire us to think differently, ultimately challenging us to express ourselves and ideologies in new ways. Do you have any favorite artists you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? YK: Indeed, I would say that the admiration of other artists that have a significant influence on our inspiration is absolutely necessary. Personally, my photographic capturing is influenced by the work of the Irish novelist-poet-playwright Samuel Beckett. As an exponent of the artistic movement, “The Theatre of the Absurd”, Beckett marries the dystopia of human suffering to black humor in a minimalistic depiction. Well, right there, in these elements of Samuel’s literary interpretation lies the driving force of my inspiration. TPL: If you could just choose one photographer to shoot alongside for a day...who would you choose? And why? YK: There are many photographers I admire, even when the approaches are different. I believe that unconscious interactions occur, thus forming new perspectives. But I have my own special preferences, mainly because some artists speak directly to our inner identity. So, if I had to choose, I would choose the photographer Laura Makabresku. Her work, contemporary, deeply inspired, captivates me and slowly dives me into a dreamlike journey. What we admire is not random. We usually see in other photographers’ work our own emotions that haven’t become photographs yet. ​ ​ Photography taught me to ask myself which is the reality, where it is and whether it exists. Quite early on I undid the illusion that I was photographing reality. TPL: Your work you have shared has an important connection to place. What have been some of your most favorite places to photograph, where do you find inspiration to explore through your photography, and what draws you there? YK: I love and I am inspired by anything that has memories, colors, smells, sounds, music but above all anything that is full of the element of abstraction. Almost obsessively, I enjoy discovering abandoned buildings that have an exciting story to tell. I perceive the discovery of the location as a journey of exploration through space-time. It functions in a completely liberating way for the whole process of a photo shoot. A lot of times I don’t know from the beginning where I will drive my car to, and that is the beauty of wandering, that I can lose control and drive in front of a place full of dirt or a wall that is ready to fall. Nobody knows, until they discover. TPL: We all face obstacles along the way, what are some of the challenges you have faced as a photographer? How have you overcome them? What made you persevere? YK: I agree. That’s exactly how it is. Many obstacles occur, the hard thing to do is to insist. I think that the biggest challenge I had to deal with as a photographer is the struggle with myself. That is, to be able to overcome my fears and insecurities so that I don’t stop believing in my photographic dreams. As weird as it may sound, the covid period was the cause for me to believe more in myself as an artist. Of course it didn’t happen by accident, as I lost my job and everything I had invested until then, but photography was there to heal me. The abundance of free time provided what I would call a rare opportunity for introspection. What has made me persist is probably “that it couldn’t have happened any other way”. But isn’t that what happens with everything we love? ​ ​ TPL: When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… YK: See landscapes, empty of people. In this way I manage to coexist with nature, breathing oxygen and smells. ​ ​ Concept / Idea / Photography: Ypatia Kornarou Video Art: Ilenya Lekka Models : Nadia Valavani, Angie Filinta, Antonis Karastergiou, Miranda Zisimopoulou, Vasilis Psyllas Production Assistant: Elizabeth Efstathiou ​ It has been a pleasure interviewing Ypatia, and our team at The Pictorial List thank her for her insightful answers to questions we asked about her intriguing and engaging work. We look forward to new inspiration as her journey unfolds. VIEW YPATIA'S PORTFOLIO Website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

  • VISUAL AMBIGUITIES | IN CONVERSATION WITH MARC PENNARTZ

    INTERVIEW July 23, 2021 VISUAL AMBIGUITIES ​ Photography by Marc Pennartz Interview by Melanie Meggs As a society, we often can be drawn to what is beautiful and perfect. However, Belgian street photographer Marc Pennartz has a different eye. He delights in the strange, the forgotten, the imperfect – the scenes that, on first glance, may seem meaningless. He revels in the chaos of daily life and enjoys surrendering to chance. His photographs can be mysterious and ambiguous – he captures a moment and leaves it to the viewer to interpret. Marc was born in the Netherlands, lived in Sweden, and is now based in the Antwerp region of Belgium. He initially picked up a camera to illustrate articles he wrote as a journalist. Over time, however, he has devoted himself to his own interpretation of street photography. He uses a simple and lightweight digital camera to take shots in public spaces, often featuring people but rarely making them the focus of the photograph. The images Marc produces tend to lean towards the abstract. He wants to evoke an emotion but leaves it all up to the viewer's imagination. He often lectures and conducts workshops on street photography, sharing his distinct vision with others. Marc is a passionate photographer who believes that the best photographs are those that are not fully understood and instead require examination and contemplation. For him, the beauty lies in the unknown. “I think every great photograph has a McGuffin too: an element that you can sense without seeing it. If you feel there is one in a given situation, click! If you don’t feel it, look elsewhere. Put a few McGuffin's together and you have a reflection of your personality.” IN CONVERSATION WITH MARC PENNARTZ THE PICTORIAL LIST: Marc please tell us about yourself. How did you become interested in photography? MARC PENNARTZ: I was born in the Netherlands, spent some time in Sweden and now live in Belgium. I’m a photographer, copywriter, journalist, website creator, content manager, writer of fiction and nonfiction, musician, blogger and also give street photography workshops when the coronavirus allows. My father was a hobby photographer and my first camera was a Kodak Instamatic which I got in my early teens from my older brother. I immediately liked it but it wasn’t until I worked as a magazine editor before photography became more important. When living in Sweden I never left home without a point and shoot, taking snapshots in the forest, and about five years ago, street photography came into my life. TPL: Your work has been best described as 'glimpses' of reality. Tiny fragments of what is around us. Artists often build up and experiment towards a method of working. Has your imagery become more abstract over time, or did you know exactly what you wanted from the beginning? What has been the inspiration for your street photography? MP: In my street photography, I initially took the traditional approach, trying to document human life in the city, but I quickly felt something lacking. I didn’t feel any magic in randomly taking pics of people on the street. Duane Michals once said that photos shouldn’t tell you something you already know, and I agree. So gradually I began to pay more attention to architectural elements, colors, reflections, trash and lots of dirty windows, to make my images more interesting and add a little bit of mystery or wonder. Do you know what a McGuffin is? Alfred Hitchcock used the term for a device or driving force for a movie that more often than not is invisible. I think every great photograph has a McGuffin too: an element that you can sense without seeing it. If you feel there is one in a given situation, click! If you don’t feel it, look elsewhere. Put a few McGuffins together and you have a reflection of your personality. TPL: Talk to us about your stunning virtual 3D exhibition and book "Searching For Quiet". You also stated, "I could have jumped in front of a train, but went out on the street instead and frantically started shooting in a desire for peace and quiet. I have not yet returned from that trip." Could you explain to us what you mean by this? MP: Street photography came into my life at a time when I was confronted with a terrible series of setbacks in my personal life. Going out on the streets enabled me to forget about all the misery. I guess making art, in whatever form, always is a way of coping with the darker side of life. Call it self-therapy or escapism. You create your own little universe in which you are in control, and nothing from the real world can interfere without your involvement. In a way, artists are people who love to play God 😊 The exhibition gave me the chance to see if my pictures of scratches, broken glass, graffiti, containers, torn plastic and lonely people would work in the sterile environment of an art gallery, be it a virtual one. It’s funny how photos feel different when you change the context. Normally, when I look at one of my street photos, I still hear the traffic or smell the diesel from a passing van, but when presented on a clean white wall and with civilized piano music, it suddenly becomes an almost pastoral thing. Weird. TPL: Do you think this is the way of the future having 3D virtual exhibitions? Some prefer them, as it gives them the opportunity to be able to reach that global audience. What are your thoughts? What was it like curating your own exhibition? MP: I think virtual exhibitions are more like alternatives for slideshows and online portfolios, rather than a replacement for real exhibitions. The problem is that in art, size matters. People will always want to see the real thing at a proper size. It’s also fair to say that images that are rich in detail simply work better when they’re big. Besides, exhibitions are also social gatherings that many of us don’t want to give up. Nevertheless, 3D versions make a valuable addition and I’ve reached people that otherwise would not have seen my work. Choosing photos is of course never easy, especially if you first go through all your work, and then narrow it down to 40. I didn’t do that. Instead I chose to pick the ones that just came to my mind, based on the idea that you will always remember what’s really good. That way I got 60 or 70, and then I got down to 40 and turned it into a consistent collection. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? MP: Just to name a few...Guy Bourdin for his provocative style and twisted humour. Ernst Haas for his incredible versatility. Sarah Moon for her otherworldly aesthetic. André Kertész for his humanity, Harry Gruyaert for his use of color, Edward Steichen for his romantic imagery. People keep telling me they see traces of Saul Leiter in my more abstract street work. He was a bit of an introverted outsider, and I guess, the same applies to me. I believe that your personality inevitably shines through in your choice of subjects and the way you approach them. TPL: Do you have a favourite place to photograph? MP: I almost exclusively shoot in Antwerp and Brussels, partly because they’re so close to where I live, and partly because I like the visual qualities of the urban chaos of Belgian cities. I love things that are “not right” and a bit ugly. However, if I would still live in a rural area, I would probably be a landscape photographer. Essentially, photography is not about trees or houses, animals or people, but about conveying emotion through shapes, contrasts, colors. You can find anything of that within few square kilometres around your home, wherever you are. Do you know what a McGuffin is? Alfred Hitchcock used the term for a device or driving force for a movie that more often than not is invisible. I think every great photograph has a McGuffin too: an element that you can sense without seeing it. TPL: When you take pictures, do you usually have a concept in mind of what you want to shoot, or do you let the images just "come to you", or is it both? MP: I very much rely on instinct. Concepts sometimes emerge from the work I have done, instead of the other way round, and then I sometimes use them to build upon. Normally, I leave much to chance and what happens to meet my eye. When I walk in the city, I focus on light, shadow, textures, structures, glass or color. When I see something interesting, I compose the image and then often wait to incorporate some human element. A hand, shade or the back of a head is enough to add life and a sense of proportion. But people are not a must. It really depends on the situation. TPL: You said that "brands don't shoot, eyes do!" Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? MP: Many websites, youtubers and writers put a lot of emphasis on gear and settings. As a result, they create the idea that fancy cameras and certain settings make good pictures, but that’s not true. It all depends on who operates the tool. Michael Kenna made awesome work with a 50-dollar plastic Holga, André Kertész created magic with a Polaroid, and there are so many great images that are unsharp, or underexposed or overexposed according to the unwritten rules of photography. This is art. There’s no beauty in a histogram. The last few years I have been using two mirrorless cameras and a few prime lenses. I mainly shoot with a 50mm full frame for regular street photos and a 112mm for more abstract work. They are all budget models of different brands, yet fast and sharp enough for my needs. When I want some special effects, I play with my shutter speed or try double exposure. Or I put some olive oil on a UV filter, move the camera intentionally or shoot through plastic foil. It’s way more fun to find such solutions than to focus on new gear. TPL: What are some of your goals as an artist or photographer? Where do you hope to see yourself in five years? MP: Toughest question of the day. I never think in terms of career or goals, but as long as there’s still a McGuffin in my work, I'll be good. I also have some wild, secret dreams of exhibitions in unusual places, but I’m pretty sure they will remain a secret forever. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? MP: Recently I started doing black & white photography again, to create dark and moody work with a slightly nostalgic feel. It also includes landscapes and nature. Feels like there’s potential there. I'm not quitting color photography though, nor will I quit street photography. I'm just searching for quiet with a broader horizon. TPL: When I am not out photographing, I (like to)... MP: Edit? ​ ​ Marc Pennartz's work is an amazing example of how a photographer can use ambiguity to create a powerful emotion within the viewer. His ability to capture the emotion of a moment and the power of the imagination make him one of the most unique photographers in the field. To truly appreciate his work, take the time to view it from different angles and with various elements to fully understand the magic of his photography. Explore Marc's work and experience the emotion and power of his photography. VIEW MARC'S PORTFOLIO Website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

  • THE SPIRIT OF A PLACE | IN CONVERSATION WITH ULKA CHAUHAN

    INTERVIEW January 15, 2021 THE SPIRIT OF A PLACE ​ Photography by Ulka Chauhan Interview by Karin Svadlenak Gomez Indian photographer Ulka Chauhan is somewhat of a wanderer. Always on the go to wherever personal and photography travel takes her. Her love for the medium began in the 80s when her dad gifted her a red Olympus camera. Having rediscovered her love for photography, Ulka has travelled to various cities and villages in India to capture the spirit of each place. But instead, has been captured by the intensity of the people. Her work has been exhibited at the Meraki exhibition held at the Nine Fish Art Gallery in Mumbai in 2019. In the current pandemic times, her explorations are of candid moments on the streets of Mumbai, London and Zurich. “Through my street work, I hope to inspire people to see the extraordinary in all the ordinary moments that take place in our backyards. And through my documentary work, I hope to spark conversations about topics that interest me. I like the human element in my work. Sometimes it is the silhouette of a person. But more often than that, I like to get close to my subjects and try to capture their expressions and emotions.” IN CONVERSATION WITH ULKA CHAUHAN THE PICTORIAL LIST: Ulka, please tell us about yourself. How did you become interested in photography? ULKA CHAUHAN: Originally from India, I have lived in Bombay, Boston, New York, Cape Town and Zurich; and currently divide my time between Bombay and Zurich. My love for photography began in the early 80s when my dad gifted me a red Olympus camera. I was down with chickenpox and was in home quarantine, but I enthusiastically photographed everything in sight. Since then, a camera has been my constant companion over the years. But about a year and half ago, I had a turning point when I went on a photo tour to Masai Mara. It was there in the vast open plains of Africa that I got bitten by the photography bug. I love photography because it has helped me find my voice. It has been a refuge for me during difficult times and a safe space to explore a multitude of emotions of motherhood, conflict, hope, love, isolation, and resilience. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? UC: Apart from the inspiration I find online, I love looking at photo books. I have a small but growing collection of them. I also love connecting with the photography community. I get a lot of ideas from speaking with my peers and mentors. I am also fascinated by the art world. I love going to galleries and museums so that to me is a tremendous source of inspiration. My other source of inspiration is closer to home, my mother and my two daughters. They are not only my biggest fans but also my toughest critics. I learn a lot from their honest and unfiltered feedback. TPL: Do you have a favourite place to photograph? UC: I love being able to shoot in both India and Switzerland. Both these contrasting worlds - one of chaos, the other of calm - keep me motivated and inspired. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? UC: I started out loving Ansel Adams’ landscapes and Steve McCurry’s travel portraits. Then David Yarrow for wildlife and now Vivian Maier and Alex Webb, amongst many others for street photography. Two master Indian photographers whose work I look up to - Raghu Rai, who was a protégé of Henri Cartier Bresson. And Dayanita Singh whose work is in the permanent collection of Tate in London and MoMa in NY. Two master Swiss photographers whose work I absolutely admire are René Groebli and René Burri. Apart from the masters, I also look at contemporary photographers for ideas and inspiration. In the art world, I love the surrealism of Salvador Dali, realism of Edward Hopper and the pop art of Andy Warhol. TPL: Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? UC: Yes I strongly believe that equipment plays a big role in your overall photography experience. I’ve always had an emotional connect with the Leica brand because my dad was a huge Leica fan and I came to acquire his last Leica camera. More recently, I bought the M10R. I use a 35mm and 28mm lens. This rangefinder system has changed the way I photograph. Being a completely manual system, it really forces me to slow down and shoot more mindfully, which I enjoy. I also really like the sense of community amongst the Leica photographers. All the Leica photographers I have connected with so far have been very friendly and supportive. ​ ​ The lens looks out to the world…it also looks within you. The photos I take are a reflection of who I am. TPL: What happens when you walk the streets with your camera? Do people respond positively to you, or do you sometimes get negative reactions? If yes, how do you handle it? UC: When I’m out on the streets capturing candid moments, or even when I’m shooting environmental portraits, I sometimes come across people who do not want to be photographed. In this case, I try to explain the purpose of what I’m doing and I respect their wishes. But these negative reactions are seldom…I don’t take them personally and also don’t let it discourage me from photographing. TPL: Have you ever been involved in the artistic world before photography? UC: I worked in advertising on Madison Ave, NY. I was in the client management side of things and was the point of communication between the client and the art directors and rest of the creative team for the accounts that I worked on. I feel this has played a big role in developing my sense of aesthetic. TPL: You have a photo series on domestic workers in India, from which we have included a few photos here. Could you tell us how you came up with that idea? UC: My domestic workers series titled 'The Real Homemakers' is an ongoing project which evolved from a desire to document the inner workings of households in urban India. There are a lot of books, TV Series and Films about domestic help in the Edwardian Era in the UK and the Segregation Era in the US. While this system has diminished in most countries over the century, it survives and thrives in India even today. India’s affluent and middle class households are equipped with full-time staff and/or part-time help that keep the homes functioning like hotels. They perform a range of services from childcare, cooking, serving, dishwashing, cleaning, laundry, driving, gardening and guarding. They play such an integral role in the homes - they are in fact the real homemakers. TPL: What are some of your goals as an artist? Where do you see yourself or hope to see yourself in five years? UC: I hope to continually evolve as a photographer and to create work that is meaningful and touches others. I would like to reach others through publications and exhibitions. My dream is to publish a photo book of my work over time. I am also very fascinated by short documentary videos that have a combination of still and moving images as a medium for storytelling; and I am currently in the process of learning the basics of filmmaking. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? UC: I have an idea for a documentary project in Zurich which is still in the initial phase of conception. I’m currently working under the guidance of a Swiss reportage photographer to develop that further. I also have two documentary project ideas that I’m exploring with a Lisbon-London based photographer. TPL: When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… UC: I love going to galleries and museums. I love going to restaurants, cafes and bars. I love spending time with family and friends. I also enjoy connecting with other photographers. Ulka Chauhan's work is an inspiring example of how the power of photography can capture moments and stories that would otherwise go unnoticed. Through her travels around India, London, and Zurich, she has been able to freeze time and give life to her photographs. We can learn from her in terms of expressing our own stories and perspectives in our photography. VIEW ULKA'S PORTFOLIO Read MYSTIC VOYAGE >>> Website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

  • THE RAW AND GRIT OF HAWAII | IN CONVERSATION WITH TIM HUYNH

    INTERVIEW March 15, 2021 THE RAW AND GRIT OF HAWAII ​ Photography by Tim Huynh Interview by Melanie Meggs From the vibrant streets of Hawaii to the gritty cityscapes of New York City, Tim Huynh has become an inspirational figure for street photographers across the globe. His eye-catching images of the streets have captured the attention of many, leading to his directorial debut with the documentary FILL THE FRAME. As an ardent street photographer himself, Tim has worked tirelessly to showcase the raw and honest beauty of city life through his lens. Inspired by Vivian Maier's captivating photographs, Tim set out on a journey to explore the streets and document the lives of its inhabitants. Having traveled from Hawaii to Chicago and ultimately arriving in New York, Tim has had an incredible journey that has shaped his work and his outlook on life. From short documentaries to feature films, Tim's story shows how determination and passion can lead to great successes. Today we take a look at the story of Tim Huynh, a passionate street photographer and talented filmmaker, as he shares with us his awe-inspiring journey. Through his words, we will gain insight into both his life and his work on FILL THE FRAME, which follows eight contemporary New York City street photographers as they strive to tell their stories through their art. Join us as we travel with Tim and discover how he found success in photography and film. “Because I shoot mainly in Honolulu, I wanted to showcase a different side that not many people see. Hawaii isn’t all waves, palm trees, and beach bodies. The real side of Hawaii sometimes isn’t all that pretty. Over the years, times have gotten hard, there’s more homeless on the street and folks just living very modest lifestyles. These are the stories I capture in my photos.” IN CONVERSATION WITH TIM HUYNH THE PICTORIAL LIST: Tim please tell us about yourself. How did you become interested in photography and filmmaking? TIM HUYNH: I’m a first generation Vietnamese, born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii and currently still residing here. I didn’t grow up surfing waves like most of my friends, or play youth sports. I spent most of my time taking extra math lessons, playing out on the streets in my neighborhood of Kapahulu, and watching professional wrestling. Pro-wrestling such as the WWE (then WWF), was a big part of my childhood, I always loved storytelling, drama, capturing the attention of the audience. This and street photography are probably the two topics I know really well or at least am very passionate about. Interesting enough both are very niche in their industries. In grade school I was the class clown, I enjoyed making others laugh even if it meant making an ass out of myself. I still do it to this day. I was never the smartest kid or the hardest working kid. And I was nowhere near being naturally talented. However, if I discover something of interest and I set a goal, I go full attack mode. I’m not afraid of failure and I’m not afraid of shame. I embrace those two things as it pushes me to never experience those feelings ever. I got into filmography as a senior in high school when I took a video making class for my elective. I had plans to go to college at the University of Hawaii but at the time had no idea what to major in. Luckily, UH had just launched their film school and their program got approved by the time I started. While studying in the Academy of Creative Media at UH, I took a documentary class that really positioned me on this journey. I’ve always loved documentaries. I like being presented with facts and finding out the truth about a subject. But also I hate to follow the herd, so while the majority of my peers gravitated towards fiction cinema, I decided to go rogue. It turned out to be the right direction as I had produced a short documentary on my handicap uncle and it won Best Short Documentary at the school’s year end awards program. After graduation I did a few other short docs but it soon became a burning dream to produce a feature documentary. In 2010, I was in Chicago interning at a small production studio and one of the fellow interns was telling me about Vivian Maier. He showed me her website and told me the whole back story on how his friend John Maloof bought these negatives from an auction and started scanning them and uploading the images on the internet. Her images had inspired me, it was so raw and full of life. I thought to myself, if I’m in Chicago where many of these images were produced, I can do that too. I started walking around Rogers Park and Michigan Avenue just snapping away. What resulted was a bunch of out of focus images, mainly of the homeless. Already I had a greater appreciation for Vivian Maier and what she was able to capture. From that week of shooting I had a greater appreciation for her photographs and what she was able to capture. She made it look so simple and easy, but of course it wasn’t. TPL: How did the idea for the documentary FILL THE FRAME come about? What was the process behind making the movie and finding the photographers? TH: I was very determined to make a full-length documentary. Usually in documentary film, you need to have some sort of connection with the subject matter. As my interest in street photography continued to grow, I realized this was it! There weren't many other films out there (other than the most notable “Everybody Street”), yet there are so many people around the world that pursue this form of photography. I let the idea brew for a couple years, just to ensure that I would still feel passionate about it. After a while I decided instead of daydreaming about this documentary, I needed to put my ideas into action. My original idea was to highlight a street photographer in different parts of the world but knew realistically that would not be possible with a limited budget. So I just narrowed it down to New York City. The location has such a rich history and contained a mix of seasoned and new street shooters. I then contacted photographers that I was already following on Instagram and sent them a questionnaire asking them to detail a little more about their own personal back story. Many didn’t respond to my emails, others I did not find too interesting, and few did not want to be involved. Can you blame them? They must have been thinking who’s this kid from Hawaii doing a documentary on New York City street photographers. I’m very happy with the eight photographers casted in the film. All are excellent photographers with amazing backstories. To me these backstories help bring their photography to life. Taking nice pictures isn't enough, there was more of the story to unveil for these photographers. So I was up for the challenge. TPL: What were the challenges in making the film? In the end, what did you learn and take away from this experience? Would you do anything different next time? TH: Of course the biggest challenge was not being a New York native. When I went to film, it was actually my first time visiting the city. There was a lot of research to be done, and filming continued even after I returned home to Hawaii. Initially, I did not want to shoot too many Q&As with the cast on the streets. I originally thought it would feel more like a YouTube video, but looking back, I would have liked to add more footage of the interview while on the street. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? TH: People in my life inspire me. My mom inspires me. My wife and kids inspire me. Paul Kessel, who in his 80s and motivated to capture his next best shot, inspires me. TPL: What happens when you go out with your camera? Do people respond positively to you, or do you sometimes get negative reactions? If yes, how do you handle it? TH: Luckily, I’ve never experienced any serious confrontation. Most of the time I’ll ignore or pretend I don’t speak English. I guess that’s the benefit of living in a tourist trap. ​ ​ I’m not afraid of failure and I’m not afraid of shame. I embrace those two things as it pushes me to never experience those feelings ever. TPL: Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? TH: Recently I’ve been using the Ricoh GR III street edition camera. You can watch and subscribe to my light hearted videos on my YouTube channel - www.youtube.com/wordonthestreetphoto Prior to the GR III, I was using Olympus EM5 Mark ii for six years. It’s a small discreet camera, which makes it easy to take photos on the go. I have lots of memories with that one. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? TH: My favorite street photographer is probably Vivian Maier because she was my discovery into street photography. She started me out on this street photography journey. ​ ​ TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? What are some of your goals? Where do you hope to see yourself in five years? TH: Currently, I’m just trying my best to promote FILL THE FRAME. I feel like there is a larger audience who has not yet seen the film. I also am looking to get back into producing YouTube content. Without a professional publicist, I’m personally reaching out to magazines, bloggers, podcasts and doing my own PR to help get the word out on the film. I think there’s much to enjoy when watching Fill The Frame. It’s not just a film about street photography but rather a film about the hope and dreams of the people in the film and how the past connects to the present and future. This film is not just for avid street photographers or fans but it focuses on a more human element. Anyone who has been bullied, who had a career change, or experiencing the unknowns after retirement can resonate with the film. In five years, I see myself producing another FILL THE FRAME in another city. I need to get on the hype train while there’s still room. TPL: When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… TH: Spend time with my family! That’s what keeps me occupied these days. ​ ​ Tim Huynh's story is a heart-warming and inspiring tale of how determination and passion can lead to great successes. His journey from Hawaii to New York City has taught him about the raw beauty of the streets and its inhabitants, and his love for photography and film have given us an amazing documentary. VIEW TIM'S PORTFOLIO Read FILL THE FRAME >>> Fill the Frame Video Trailer >>> Tim's YouTube Channel >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

  • IVAN DOMARATSKIY

    IVAN DOMARATSKIY be inspired Gallery // ARTIST STATEMENT // I am a physicist, an amateur film photographer and a mixed media artist. LOCATION RUSSIA CAMERA Pentax SF7, Pentax ME, Mamiya RB67, Agat 18K CATEGORY landscape, pictorialism, portrait ​ @IVAN.DOMARATSKIY ​ ​ FEATURES // Pictorialistic Reality

  • EIGHT HOURS | IN CONVERSATION WITH ENZO CRISPINO

    INTERVIEW February 15, 2021 EIGHT HOURS ​ Photography by Enzo Crispino Interview by Melanie Meggs Enzo Crispino is an acclaimed artist and interpreter of photography who defies conventional definitions of what a photographer is. Born in Frattamaggiore, a small town in the South of Italy, Enzo has been recognised for artistic merit by the International Academy of Modern Art in Rome and has been awarded the Diploma al Merito in Art by the Accademia di Significazione Poesia e Arte Contemporanea. His work has been widely published in esteemed magazines, and he has had two books published. His latest project 'Eight Hours' explores the human experience through a series of stunning photographs. As the world continues to evolve and technology advances, so do the ways in which work is performed and completed. From the introduction of automated processes to the mass transfer of production, the workforce has experienced a dramatic shift, with a significant reduction in role and increase in job losses. Through 'Eight Hours' project, Enzo seeks to commemorate and remember this ever-changing industry, creating nostalgic scenes of a once bustling metalworking company that has since been transformed into an exhibition space. His aim is to capture the memories of this type of work and provide visitors with a glimpse into the history of a place that was once full of life. Through the use of carefully chosen tones, Enzo hopes to evoke a sense of melancholic beauty, allowing visitors to connect with the past and recognize the impact that advancements in technology have had on the workforce. Through his art, Enzo invites us to discover the world around us through a unique and captivating perspective. “It was important for me to emphasise the enormous loss of skills created in these small engineering companies, which were very widespread in northern Italy where these manual skills were fundamental, while today with the digitization and robotization of the industrial process they are no longer needed. In this way we will lose forever the great training school of the mechanical engineering world. My intention is to induce all of us to question ourselves about the negative effects that globalisation inevitably brings with its relentless pursuit of profit as an absolute goal. Cultural roots and memory make us emerge for our place, our history and cultural diversification, are a heritage and a wealth that people of every place cannot afford to lose, beyond which there is only homologation.” IN CONVERSATION WITH ENZO CRISPINO THE PICTORIAL LIST: Enzo you have shared with us your special documentary project EIGHT HOURS. What is this about? ENZO CRISPINO: These fifteen photos are part of a project with the same name composed of eighty five images, which I realized in the small metalworking company where I have been working for 22 years as a turner on machine tools. The 'Eight Hours' project that I present is inspired by an idea based on two considerations: the massive transfer of production and the increasing automation of all processes in the sector that have had a strong impact on the workforce employed, both eliminating it and reducing its role. In this project I wanted to give a nostalgic imprint, using tones that would help me to imagine this metalworking company no longer operational, but only as an exhibition space; its ultimate utility function. Ample spaces are offered to visitors, where its previous appearance is shown, leaving these spaces now destined to cultivate 'memory'. TPL: The negative impact of globalisation has thrown uncertainty over our smaller industries worldwide. You personally are being impacted. What would you like the viewer to experience when they see these images? What would you like for them to take away from this? What did this project reveal about yourself? EC: When I decided to create the photographic project “Otto Ore” (Eight Hours) I posed many questions, the prevailing one was whether it would be useful to produce it. In those photos I brought a small reality out of the context of the world of metalworking, unknown to most people, made of old machinery and tools whose use is not familiar to everybody. Certainly I would not have produced anything original, since photographs and books on the world of work and industrial architecture have existed for a long time, a masterful example is the reportage on Pittsburg that the American photographer W. Eugene Smith did for Magnum in 1955, or the important research of the German couple Bernd and Hilla Becher. Nevertheless I wanted to talk about 'my' world of work, a daily school that teaches us to know and love what work is and to discover that there is also the culture of work. That culture made of territorial identity of the world of work that unfortunately we are losing with the advent of the new dogma of 'globalisation' in the 2000s. In these photos, where I have taken pictures of details of machine tools that I use every day, I wanted to connote it with a choice of a particular chromatism that would induce a nostalgic sense, even to those who observe them and are not familiar with this small but important world of work. I think that a small result has been to draw attention to such a particular subject. An Italian publisher decided to make it into an editorial project by publishing a book with the same title. The project has also received the attention of several photo magazines in Italy, France, Spain, Germany, Austria, England, and Australia, plus a personal exhibition of three months in my home town during the 13th edition of the Festival of Photography and Fotografia Europea 2019 Reggio Emilia, sponsored by the same municipal body. TPL: You do not consider yourself a photographer but an interpreter of photography? Can you explain what you mean? EC: In the beginning, photography was just a simple hobby for me, I didn't pose any questions, I just took pictures because I liked what I saw and it attracted my attention. As time went by, this hobby turned into something more important that stimulated me to go deeper. I felt the need to fill my gaps in photographic technique, but even after this study I was still dissatisfied. I didn't feel the photos I took were mine, I perceived them as anonymous, cold images, far from me without a personal identification. By reading books on photography I decided to study chromaticism and how to interpret it differently in photography. In one of them, a book by one of the great masters of Italian photography, Luigi Ghirri, the author described what photography was for him. He said, "Photography is not pure duplication or a chronometer of the eye that stops the physical world, but it is also a language in which the difference between reproduction and interpretation, no matter how subtle, exists and gives rise to an infinity of imaginary worlds." It was revelatory for me, it was the answer to my continuous dissatisfaction, his thought gave me the way to understand that photography has different languages. Taking a picture is not only to freeze forever a moment, but in it we have the possibility to transfer any emotion, feeling, or mood, artistically reinterpreting that moment with our own sensitivity and making it unique, so it will never be just a photograph as an end in itself. TPL: When did you first discover your love for photography? EC: My encounter with photography was completely accidental, during a driving vacation to England in the summer of 1990. At that time I had bought a compact Ricoh camera without any ambition but only to bring home some memories. During the vacation I remember the moment when we were in Avebury visiting the Stone Circle, I asked a friend if he would let me see through the viewfinder of his Minolta Reflex camera the scenario in which we were immersed and I clearly remember the huge wonder I felt. At the end of the vacation I decided to get started with the hobby of photography by buying my first low-cost reflex camera, a Canon 1000. TPL: In general, your photography feels incredibly personal, focusing on storytelling and pulling the viewer into your inner thoughts. What do you want to express through your photography? And what are some of the elements you always try to include in your photographs? EC: I have been asked this question many times on other occasions and this has always been a reason for me to feel embarrassed; I am afraid of appearing inappropriate, of giving a presumptuous image of myself. I don't intentionally seek to create an intimate photograph: it is a natural inclination deriving from the fascination I have for poetry. When I visit certain places (e.g. the interior of a house or a beach), before taking the photos, my eyes observe and are guided by the verses I have in my mind to build the new project, and the photos come by themselves, without ever looking for the perfect photo. I have never been interested in producing a perfect shot. I've always been looking for one thing only, namely that photography should give me an emotion even in its imperfection. That same imperfection which has always been present in my photographs. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? EC: In 2015 I had to take a pause for reflection, unable to take pictures anymore, and feeling the need for a change, something giving me new life in taking up the camera again. While preparing my first photographic project, I realized that I needed something giving it some 'consistency' to avoid building up a simple sequence of images as an end in itself, even if well structured. I then recalled a poem by the Italian poet Giuseppe Ungaretti entitled 'Wake' that I had studied at school. I associated my photos with the verses and realized that they fit together perfectly. Since then, in each of my new projects I try (but do not always succeed) to blend poetry and photography together. I think that conceptual photography inspired by a poem, or a free excerpt of some verses, gives more depth to the work itself. This analysis process fascinates me, and I need it to find the answers I am looking for. Photography can also be not merely a matter of photos, but an association of two fields combined to create something new. Poetry has since then become my first inspiration in thinking and preparing photographic projects. Like many others, I have my favourite poets from whom I take inspiration: Alda Merini, Giuseppe Ungaretti, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Pablo Neruda, Gabriele D' Annunzio. For some time I had been trying to find my own way in color, something in which I could recognize myself, and I found it in the dominant yellow that I wanted to always be perceptible in my photos. TPL: Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? EC: I have never thought that a camera could give a particular contribution to the vision in photography and I have never chosen an SLR camera just for its brand. On the contrary, I've always had a strong curiosity in photography. It has made me realise that if you don't have photography in your mind first, you will never have it in your eyes. I've never been attracted by special techniques in taking pictures or preference of focal lengths. Depending on the situation I've always set the one I thought was most suitable. I have been photographing for seven years with a mirrorless Olympus E-M1 and always with a single lens mounted, the Olympus Pro 12-40mm f2.8. TPL: When you go out to photograph, do you have a concept in mind of what you want to shoot, or do you let the images just 'come to you', or is it both? EC: The concept that I want to transpose into images since I began to produce photographic projects is already present in my mind when I take a picture. Later on when I am on a site, I let myself be moved by my state of mind in that moment and I interpret the original concept that I had in mind. Only this way I can create a photograph that is as personal and true as I seek it to be. TPL: Have you ever been involved in the creative world before photography? EC: I've always been fascinated by art, visiting exhibitions and museums. Thanks to my passion for photography, this has given me a further opportunity to learn it more thoroughly, relating with many artists during the participation in collective national and international exhibitions representing a fruitful and important cultural exchange. TPL: What are some of your goals as an artist? Where do you see yourself or hope to see yourself in five years? EC: My goal is to have the chance to continue to be moved by photography more and more. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? EC: For some time now I have been studying a French photographer from the past. Two of his books on the city of Paris fascinate me particularly, his name is Eugene Atget. I'm working on two projects inspired by his style, the first is on Paris, I have tried to translate his evocative atmospheres in a modern urban context where presence of man is pretty inexistent, giving a stylishly vintage yet elegant connotation. TPL: When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… EC: I love reading, a way for me to relax my head from worries, I prefer historical novels and books of poetry. Enzo Crispino has sought to commemorate the evolution of the workforce and capture the memories of those who have been affected by it. His photographs provide viewers with an appreciation for the beauty in the history of the industry and a sense of respect for the impact that technology has had on the workforce. With his captivating images, Enzo invites us to discover the world around us with a unique perspective. View more of Enzo's photography to further appreciate the beauty of his work and to reflect upon the changes that continue to shape our society. VIEW ENZO'S PORTFOLIO Enzo's website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

  • NEVILLE NEWMAN

    NEVILLE NEWMAN be inspired Gallery // ARTIST'S STATEMENT // I am an unrecognized, unfeted, and unknown photo-enthusiast. You won't find me writing about myself in the third person, listing the publications whose pages I have enlivened by my work or giving a catalogue of the equipment I have used. I do not classify myself as any one type of photographer. I simply want to share my experiences in different settings and locations. LOCATION Hamilton CANADA CAMERA Canon 7D and 7D Mkii, Mamiya 6 CATEGORY all genres WEBSITE http://nfnphoto.com/ ​ @XSBMRNR ​ FEATURES // Wildcats Winning Women Tomorrow's A Mystery

  • DAVID QUEVILLART

    DAVID QUEVILLART be inspired Gallery // ARTIST STATEMENT // I almost always go out with my camera, even to get a baguette. Few times when I have a subject in mind, I let myself be absorbed by atmospheres, captured by lights or be attracted by lines. Then either the camera is drawn and the photo taken quickly, or I post myself a bit like a fisherman, waiting for the right moment, blending in with the background, so as to make me forget. I work full time as a social worker, in Lille, in the North of France and as soon as the opportunity arises I set off to discover new cities and new countries. LOCATION Nord FRANCE CAMERA Panasonic Lumix GX-8 CATEGORY street, candid ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

  • FRAMING MY ADVENTURE | IN CONVERSATION WITH CASPER DAM

    INTERVIEW June 18, 2020 FRAMING MY ADVENTURE ​ Photography by Casper Dam Interview by Karinn Svadlenak Gomez Growing up in the rural part of Denmark, Casper Dam now lives in the Denmark's second largest city, Aarhus. Due to a major shift towards visual user driven communication in his job, Casper needed to learn about practical photography fast. This ignited into a full fledged obsession for him. Whilst he started out photographing minimalist black and white street, he has now shifted towards colour compositions. The street for Casper is an open playground for him where he finds a means of expressing himself. “I love to frame something ordinary in an extraordinary way. It is a way of seeing adventure everywhere and keeps me from ever getting bored. These kinds of snapshots align with something within myself.” IN CONVERSATION WITH CASPER DAM THE PICTORIAL LIST: Casper, when did you start getting interested in photography? CASPER DAM: My dad has been photographing for fifty odd years, but I first surrendered 4-5 years ago. I needed to learn about creative photography for my job in Social Media Communications and bought my very first camera. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? CD: Movies, listening to music, my photography books. Just carrying a camera everywhere in itself is perhaps my biggest inspiration. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? CD: Alex Webb for all the complicated layers. There is a claustrophobic, cinematic feel to them. Trent Parke for his work with the light, in every subject matter really. And fellow Aarhus resident Jonas Rask for life with a camera. By now, I see him more as a friend, but his drive to always shoot and ability to make almost anything work has been an inspiration for me ever since I started. TPL: Has your style of shooting changed since you first started? CD: I gradually transitioned from minimalist black and white into colour photography. My interest in multiple layers and colour luminance has grown big. This Göethean idea that the mood of the scene is present by the quality of light itself. TPL: Where is your favourite place to photograph? CD: I love the vibrancy of the Raval in Barcelona or the Lavapies in Madrid. But any city by the sea can keep me occupied for days. ​ ​ Just carrying a camera everywhere in itself is perhaps my biggest inspiration. TPL: Do you think equipment is important in achieving your vision in your photography? What would you say to someone just starting out? CD: The simpler the gear, the more it frees me up to see. So, maybe stick with one focal length for a long time. And learn to shoot manual, whenever you feel comfortable. It makes it easier to predict how the camera behaves and use it creatively. TPL: What characteristics do you think you need to become a good photographer? What’s your tips or advice for someone in your genre? CD: Curiosity, perseverance, adventurousness. Advice: Find your inspiration way beyond photographs. Music, paintings, anything that gives you new ideas. TPL: Have you ever been involved in the artistic world before photography? CD: I played a lot of guitar back in high School. Besides that, I have never graduated from drawing anything but stick figures. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? CD: This year, I am doing a 366 project. It is not that original, but I see it as a great exercise. So far, I like how it challenges me to photograph anything, everywhere. TPL: If I wasn't photographing what would I be doing?... CD: Going for a run or maybe taking a swim. I feel very privileged about doing these recreational activities. And probably also I am a much kinder person because of it. ​ ​ Seeing the adventure everywhere and never getting bored, Casper loves framing the everyday in extraordinary ways. Seek the adventure and connect with Casper on Instagram. VIEW CASPER'S PROFILE Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

  • THE PICTORIAL LIST | MARILENA FILAITI

    MARILENA FILAITI be inspired Gallery // ARTIST'S STATEMENT // Photography is my passion. Through the lens the world looks different and I would like to show you this difference. LOCATION Athens GREECE CAMERA Nikon D3400, Panasonic Lumix DC Vario, Canon EOS R CATEGORY fine art WEBSITE https://www.marilenafilaiti.com/ @MARILENA_FILAITI ​ ​ FEATURES // Awakening Instincts

  • SOPHIE LINCKERSDORFF

    SOPHIE LINCKERSDORFF be inspired Gallery // ARTIST'S STATEMENT // I grew up in a household of art dealers and thus had some early exposure to the art world. This later influenced my development as a photographer. Focusing on storytelling and documentary photography, I am now a photojournalist, travelling the world with the goal of taking pictures that are thought-provoking rather than merely beautiful. LOCATION Berlin GERMANY CAMERA not disclosed CATEGORY documentary WEBSITE https://www.sophie-linckersdorff.de/ ​ @SOPHIE.LINCKERSDORFF ​ FEATURES // Exclusion Zone Stories To Be Told

  • SOULS OF A CITY | IN CONVERSATION WITH BETTY MANOUSOS

    INTERVIEW April 8, 2021 SOULS OF A CITY ​ Photography by Betty Manousos Interview by Melanie Meggs Betty Manousos is no stranger to the art of photography. As a street and social documentary photographer, she has captured the essence of city life through her lens, resulting in award-winning images of people, places and culture. Betty's love for street photography has led her to document the stories behind the scenes. With a distinct eye for detail and an innate ability to capture the spontaneity of life around her, Betty's images provide a unique insight into her own take on reality. Fuelled by her passion for creating meaningful stories through her artwork, Betty founded CUT and DRY Blogzine as a platform to share her work and make it accessible to a wider audience. Joining forces with Photographic Circle Collective, she continues to push the boundaries of street photography by going beyond the typical 'snapshot' aesthetics and instead, strive to capture raw moments of emotion with an aim to leave the viewer with a sense of connection to the subject. Betty Manousos is an inspiring photographer whose dedication to her craft is evident in each frame. Her powerful images hold the power to transport us to a different place and time, taking us on a journey where we can reflect on our own experiences and interpretations of the world around us. “I was born in Athens, Greece where I currently live. I have also lived in the United Kingdom for many years. I have always been artistically inclined growing up with art in the family. My dad was a teacher and artist and my brother is a recognised painter. But I became really interested in photography when a good friend of mine from Britain - who is a black and white photographer - introduced me to the medium. Here's a little story to illustrate. That autumn we went on a photo shoot to Dartmoor in southern Devon, England. That was it. I didn't realise it at the time, but this was the beginning of what would become an obsession. I've hardly put down my camera since then.” IN CONVERSATION WITH BETTY MANOUSOS THE PICTORIAL LIST: Betty, what is it that you enjoy about street photography? Explain your technique? What do you want to express through your photography? And what are some of the elements you always try to include in your photographs? BETTY MANOUSOS: Part of the reason I enjoy street photography is the fact that there's always a different way to approach things in the terms of capturing candid street moments and I'm so excited when all the stars align; when all the elements of the scene line up perfectly, from the lighting to the unique human emotion, to the overall ambiance. For me, street photography is also ultimately liberating because it is an expression of my need to look at things differently. I've always been drawn to the power of imagery as a way to express my own completely subjective interpretation of what I feel rather than I see. Over time, I have come up with some techniques that work for me most of the time: - tilting the camera and changing the level of view - often shooting through other objects, as this allows me to create a dramatic sense of mystery in a photograph I'm less interested in creating images the traditional way - as street photography is an art form without constraint - but I'm much interested in the realm of artistic approach of things. Besides, I'm much concerned with the unusual or unexpected. As a photographer, I want my pictures to contain a surplus of meaning, to stimulate a feeling, to move the viewer emotionally. Some of the elements I try to include in my frame are: storytelling; emotion; an interesting character; the soul of a city. Sometimes I want to include only an object or trace left by humans that reveal something about life. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? BM: Inspiration comes from everywhere in any shape and form, from life itself. My significant inspiration comes from my favourite movies and books. TPL: Do you have any favourite spots to go photographing? BM: Street photography is a surprisingly difficult photographic genre to practice in Athens. That said, taking photos of strangers in public, there is always a possibility that you may get punched in the face, I haven't but I got yelled at a couple of times. Perhaps people feel threatened or have become suspicious. In my experience, many Greek people don't like having their photo taken. Perhaps they feel as though taking a photo of them is an invasion of their privacy. Underground station, deprived areas have been some of my favourite spots to photograph. TPL: How has the pandemic affected you personally and your photography? BM: When lockdown was announced, I realised that my life would have to change. Since I couldn't go out to photograph, I decided I wanted to document my life; the sad moments, the quiet moments, the process of accepting the 'new normal. The plan was to staying nimble with my camera. One of the feelings (too many feelings) that I have been experiencing during the pandemic is uncertainty. How can one live in an uncertain world? TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? BM: Ever since I started street photography, I was drawn to the high contrast work of Daido Moriyama, Saul Leiter, Harry Gruyaert, Josef Koudelka, and the art of Picasso has also influenced my photographic style. ​ ​ As a photographer, I want my pictures to contain a surplus of meaning, to stimulate a feeling, to move the viewer emotionally. TPL: Do you have a favourite quote, lyric, or saying that especially resonates with you? BM: "Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken." - Oscar Wilde. Our identity is what makes us different; it's what makes us individuals. Just be you. TPL: Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? BM: I'm definitely not a "gear person" (even with an iPhone you can take great photos). I use the Fujifilm X-T20 for my street photography, with a lot of nice lenses. With mirrorless cameras there is less to go wrong in terms of autofocus. The focal lens that just works for me is the 35mm prime; my preferred lens is a Fujinon XF35mm f/1.4 lens. TPL: When you go out photographing, do you have a concept in mind of what you want to shoot, or do you let the images just "come to you", or is it both? BM: While out shooting, I'm almost always on the move and on the lookout for photographic opportunities. In fact, I look for unusual scenes that evoke a story. That said, I always try to blend in with my surroundings to capture the perfect candid moment. TPL: Have you ever been involved in the creative world before photography? BM: I used to write a lot of short stories when I was younger. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? What are some of your goals as an artist? Where do you see yourself or hope to see yourself in five years? BM: I'm currently working on a project titled "When People Toil". It is a very challenging project. It's especially risky as that area I go is quite unsafe to walk around. Five years goals...to be working on a photo book, to be documenting an adventure of mine in photos, to be writing a book for beginners about my photographic experience and the lessons I learned along the way. I'd love to plan a trip too (if it is safe to go). TPL: "When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… BM: I read, watch movies and exercise." Betty Manousos is a talented and passionate street and social documentary photographer. Her award-winning images are a testament to her eye for detail and her ability to capture the unique moments that make up city life. If you want to view more of Betty's inspiring photography, check out her website or follow her on social media. Her creative spirit and eye for beauty will take you on a journey through the streets of her world. VIEW BETTY'S PORTFOLIO Betty's website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience. BEYOND SIGHT Doug Winter is a photographic artist using his unique perspective as a semi-sighted individual to explore the experiences of partial blindness and vision disabilities. ETERNITY Eternity is a pictorial story about Konrad Hellfeuer's own personal journey with religion and how photography has helped him find peace within it. CROSSING THE AVENUE Get ready to be transported by the street photography of Juan Sostre. His mastery of technique and ability to observe the world around him, allows us to experience the street in a whole different light. HUMAN CONTACT By walking through the streets and observing people's behaviours, Jan Ponnet tries to develop a keen eye for the subtle nuances and rhythms of life on the street, and learns to anticipate and capture these moments that might otherwise go unnoticed. FREEDOM TASTES OF REALITY Juan Barte does not choose to document what he sees, but creates a photograph that constricts the flow of information, allowing for the viewer to further investigate and question what they see. HONK KONG TAPESTRY It is the minutiae of everyday life that most defines Giles Isbell's body of work. By exploring the intricate details, Giles Isbell has created a unique tapestry of what it means to to have once called this majestic city home.

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