Karin Svadlenak Gomez

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  • BREAKS FROM REALITY

    Photography by Mariëtte Aernoudts Essay and Interview by Karen Ghostlaw Pomarico Mariëtte Aernoudts is an artist living and creating art in a small village in Raamsdonksveer, about an hour drive south of Amsterdam. Mariette is an autodidact photographer and image maker creating images visually depicting her own poetic world of fairytales. The magic only dreams are made of, become the reality the viewers are immersed in, when they engage the visual stories Mariëtte creates through her photography and poetic imagery. Mariëtte would always photograph her own children, and this led to her interests in photoshop. She enjoyed making photographic montages, expanding her abilities to create these fantastical worlds where her fairytales would soon play out. Mariëtte began engaging children in her neighborhoods and in the streets to practice and experiment with this new idea of portraiture as a montage. She started working conceptually, creating a narrative for each image, often alienating her subjects creating solitary environments. Mariëtte tells us, “I am always looking for new and innovative ways to add reflections of my own feelings and emotions to my photos and aim to take the viewer just a little step beyond the ordinary.” This inner reflection adds depth and soul to her poetic fairytales. Obstacles Mariëtte was given some good advice once that has become an important thread in her work and has become part of the way Mariëtte approaches and creates her work. They told Mariëtte to only make series that are close to her, hold meaning for her. This series of work titled ‘Obstacles’ is a photographic autobiography that tells the visual story of living with anxiety through a series of images. Mariëtte wanted to express the consequences of anxiety in many ways. “Shall I, or Shall I Not, also known as obstacles, was made to break through the taboo around living with anxiety. Millions of people have to deal with this, it is always hidden and in my opinion not accepted and is viewed as a sign of weakness.” Mariëtte depicts her subjects in conflict with the struggles they face, but also in the light, not darkness, exposing the realities not hiding them. The Journey Mariëtte shares her trilogy of poetic images in her tryptic ‘The Journey’. She conveys the whimsical story about a young girl being very curious in life. The young girl starts in the morning and her return is in the evening. “What did she experience?!? That’s totally up to the viewer to interpret.” says Mariëtte. Mariëtte brings us along for the journey allowing us to participate in the adventure. Colours One of Mariëtte’s favorite things in photography to explore is caching motion. The freedom of the movement elicits feelings of spirit of adventure and childlike joy in the playful acts of having fun. Mariëtte loves working with colors to express the fun depicted through these playful images saturated with a palette of hues expressive of the emotions and spirited wiles of youth. Mariëtte has been a member of an ambitious, small photography club for the past seven years. The goal of the club is to help each other achieve a higher level of knowledge to accomplish their photographic goals. Mariëtte is challenging herself with social themes in a variety of series. She is not trying to tell her story with documentary images, but instead she creates her fairytales through symbolism and visual poetry. Mariëtte says this new work is very relaxing and has found it to be a good way to get more connectivity to nature. Mariëtte’s photography speaks to the fantastical worlds she has created or captured in the eyes of her subjects, and oftentimes portrayed in the body language of their gestures. Mariëtte creates her spaces with details that add intrigue to her subjects, capturing your curiosity, captivating you to, smile with them, dance and sing with them, laugh and play with them, think with them, and maybe even cry with them. When Mariëtte chooses deep dark spaces to place her subjects in, the eyes become the intrigue, asking you to look deeper, to sink into their soul. I interviewed Mariëtte and this is what she shared with us at The Pictorial-List to inspire you with. Hello Mariëtte, tell us a little bit about yourself. How does where you are from influence your work? I was born in a little village in the south of the Netherlands. We had enough possibilities to play outside and used our imagination with the available situation without toys. In our village we had no cultural life, no cinema, no museum and at home we never discussed the subjects. Photography was not in my life at all. But I loved books, and had many adventures in the stories. Nowadays I live in a village in the middle of the country and spend my days mainly with photography in different ways: reading about it, experimenting, watching photos on the internet and I post sometimes, and also I work on commission. What draws you to photography and art? How did your journey into photography begin? My journey began by using my husband's analog camera. Mainly photographed our children, on birthdays, during holidays and special occasions. I wanted to make memories for the future as I don’t have any photo of myself as a child. What was the first camera you ever held in your hand, brought to eye, and released a shutter on? What is the camera you use now? Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? The first camera I held was an analog Yashica, don’t recall the type. I shot with an auto. Nowadays I have a Canon 5D Mark III and a Fuji TX3 which I always take along. I always shoot with my own camera settings and photography is always a challenge now to make the desired result as I see/feel things. You create these worlds of fantasy and illusion, with poetic notes of authenticity. You often work with children as your subject. Tell us why you choose your subjects, and how they personally have influenced your work. I think I use the subjects because they bring me into a nicer world, softer and it is a little escape from reality. Children are so open and behave so naturally, I love their sincere expressions. Nature and the environment play important roles in your work, often seeing humanity mimic nature, or your environments mimic humanity, there is a strong connection. Tell us about these connections, and how they set the stage for your portraits. Most of the time my models are selected based on their expressive faces and attitude. They are children or adults who make me feel their mood. For the portraits they don’t need a scene or setting because their expression moves me so much that this tells the whole story. In your series ‘Obstacles’ you address the challenges one faces when they are challenged with Anxiety Disorder, tell us the passion that drives this study. In fact I myself have been managing my anxiety disorder since I was ten. It made my life a daily struggle and not many people knew about it. I lived to survive each day as good and ‘normal’ as possible but my anxiety became a hindrance in many ways. It was lonely because I thought I was the only one but through the years, talking about it, I met more and more people with the same problem. This is an underestimated problem and hard to understand. Therefore I wanted to break the taboo and shame by ‘showing’ it with my photos to achieve more understanding. Do you feel your work has therapeutic or healing qualities? I hope so! For me my work is a way to relax, have fun making it and sometimes it makes me very happy. It would be awesome when viewers feel the same. Do you try to portray hope and possibilities through your studies and work? I always want to express emotions in my photography or at least try to make people curious about the story in the photo. Often the viewer can make an own story by ‘reading’ the scene. You directly engage your subjects whether in eye contact or through body language, it is honest, and genuine. Tell us the importance of this. It is very important to read body language because this tells emotions of a person and all my models are always authentic and natural. I always work with them one on one, with the presence of one parent. Try to make contact as close to themselves and my emotions as possible. Before we start we have a long chat to get acquainted. Eyes are the soul of every person. In your series of single images, light plays an inherent role in the way you illuminate and define your subject. Talk about your quality of light and what it represents in these works of art. My most used light is available light. Just a slight change of position of the head or body can make such a big difference. What I love to use is backlight to make materials like clothing or textures a bit transparent. It makes me wonder everytime when I reach this result. Light is a fantastic tool to work and play with. Sometimes the light enters a room or in plants in a way I really love and then want to catch it immediately before it will change. How long has Portraiture been a subject you have studied through photography? Actually, since I had my children, about 36 years. It all started then. The last 13 years I have spent more and more time on it. Then I started courses and workshops. The things I want to learn I look up on the internet and experiment just as long as I know how to do them. Once it took me a year to learn an act in Photoshop! Do you have any favorite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? I love the light Rembrandt used in his paintings and the colors of the Italian painter Rafaël. The photo portraits of Stephan Vanfleteren impress me very much, the way he captures the emotion of people is stunning. Sally Mann inspires me by her uninhibited child photography. My favorite Dutch photographers are Danielle van Zadelhoff, Carla Kogelman and Anton Corbijn. Are there any other photographic projects you are working on, or have planned in the near future? Where do you hope to see yourself in five years? At the moment I am working on a project with mother and child. The way to imagine the story differs sometimes but work is in progress. In five years I hope to be healthy enough to keep on doing what I am doing now. “When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… To take walks (not too far) together with my husband, have fun with my grandchildren and start to attend more art classes.” Thank you Mariëtte for the opportunity to share your work and process with us. You create meaningful work that is an inspiration to photographers and artists everywhere. Thank you for the intimate look into your world. All photographs © Mariëtte Aernoudts

  • SEEING A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND

    Photography by Nahid Sultana Introduction and interview by Karin Svadlenak-Gomez IN CONVERSATION WITH NAHID SULTANA Nahid Sultana is a photographer based in Bahrain, though she was born in Bangladesh and has travelled the world with her family - and later with her camera. Always with a creative streak, photography came to her out of a need to capture the places she sees and the emotions she feels and witnesses in others. While her favourite genre of photography is landscape, she is also adept at capturing street scenes and has an interest in expanding into long-term documentary photography. A poet at heart, she translates what she sees in the world into a kind of visual poetry that we adore. Tell us a bit about yourself, where were you born? Have you always lived in Bahrain? I spent the earliest and probably most fundamental period of my life in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We grew up in a society where boundaries didn’t exist. In fact, I don’t even think it was a concept. Most days, after school, I would play outdoors with my neighbourhood friends and we wouldn’t come back in until the sun slept. My fondest memories will always consist of spending our pocket money on ice cream and listening to the channel ‘World Music’ on my father’s radio. As I reflect on these memories, I realise a part of me was always creative. I remember drawing on my floors and walls with crayons; getting scolded by my parents. As I got older, I began to paint. I found that I could be most creative with watercolour. The idea of having to put precision and thought before starting each piece had resonated with me. I had received my Undergraduate degree at the University of Dhaka and moved to Australia to further complete my education. I continued to live in Sydney for a decade where I put most of my attention on my career development. I somewhat regret how I spent endless hours working in front of a computer that seemed to take an eternity to start up. Though I started with the most creative job in IT-a Web Designer- I shifted to the more technical side of it. Buying a good camera had always been a want but I never found the opportunity due to the whirlwind of events I had stacked, one on top of another. I moved to Bahrain with my family in 2007. For the past 15 years, it has felt like my home away from home. I do still call Australia a home, the very home where I began my solo journey. The place that taught me independence and to be content with my surroundings no matter the situation. I have been asked multiple times throughout my life where I am from and it has always been a difficult question to answer. My replies have continued to shift and change like the tides of the oceans. For every place I have experienced emotion whether it be the happy, the sad or the ugly. I have developed a deep connection with them and each place shaped me and made me the woman I am today. From your photos we know you like to travel - is that how you got into photography? Or what was it that sparked your initial interest? As I travel, I document my journey through my photos. Every experience. The place, the people, the emotions. I would find that many times I returned from a holiday with no pictures of myself but a lady by the window in a coffee shop. My passion for photography began to take off soon after my son was born in 2002. I enjoyed taking pictures of him doing things around the house. Like any first-time mum, my child was the centre of every photo. After a long day at work, watching the photos I took on my film camera develop was a pass-time I enjoyed. Between the career that I was developing and the other responsibilities, time was not my best friend and so, like most people, I pushed my hobby to the side and focused on my life around me. Eventually, in 2011, I bought my first DSLR, a NIKON D90. I was ecstatic! Through my friends, I met a few like-minded photography enthusiasts. That is when my love for photography truly bloomed. Due to an unforeseen situation, I had to again put my photography on hiatus for many years. In recent years, I bought a FUJI XT4 and resumed my passion. Though Bahrain isn’t the most picture perfect country geographically, I make the most of what the island has to offer. Talk to us about your life in Bahrain. Are there like-minded photographers you meet up with or do you rather go out alone? Bahrain is an extremely small island country situated in the Persian Gulf. It consists of 50 natural islands and 33 man-made ones. Bahraini people are amazingly friendly, welcoming and are known in the gulf to have a laid-back lifestyle. You name what you need and it’s a 10-minute drive away. The longest time it takes to cross the island is 40 minutes! My family and I originally planned to stay here for 5 years but here I am 15 years later! From the day I arrived in this country to the day I may leave; I will love this semi-city lifestyle and the hospitality from people with golden hearts. Due to the harsh weather during the summer, I don’t go out shooting unless it’s worth it. However, from November till March, the weather is beautiful and if you are lucky, you get to experience sunrises that make the water seem as if it were dipped in gold and sunsets that look like the world was set ablaze. There are quite a few photography enthusiasts in Bahrain, most simply doing it as a hobby. I have friends who I tend to go out and shoot with for street photography since the experience is much more entertaining when they are there. We share our knowledge and ideas as we take long walks through the narrow alleyways of Manama or Muharraq! Street vendors and locals in old Manama don’t particularly like seeing large amounts of people with cameras walking around the city so I tend to stick to smaller groups. When it comes to the city or landscape, I go alone. Early morning shoots by myself are always going to be my favourite since it’s just me and my thoughts as I watch the sun rising above the horizon. You seem quite interested in landscape and architecture photography. What is it that you find especially interesting about that? My Fuji XT4 is so unique in nature and very different to my previous Nikon that I actually had to learn the technical part of the camera before I could go out and shoot! The first thing I shot with my camera was a landscape and because this was during the peak of COVID-19, everywhere I went was completely empty. Not a person in sight. We were homebound for an excruciatingly long amount of time so it gave me the chance to break down and learn everything I needed for my camera -the technical knowledge, framing, editing etc. The rate at which I was shooting landscape and cityscape in Bahrain was rapidly increasing and I slowly fell in love with it. I loved the process of landscape photography and how I could play with light and shadow when I shot architecture. When finding a location to shoot; walking around and scouting frames, setting up the camera while listening to my favourite songs calms me. I find a connection between me and the ambiance and that helps me take my pictures. That’s why landscape is my favourite genre of photography. You also have some conceptual pictures - such as your series of a man with a hat against different backdrops. How do you have those ideas? If I am going to be honest, I was never a big fan of conceptual photography. That is until I came across an incredibly talented photographer Humberto Salo Dominguez. His unique style and artistic shots of a person with an umbrella or a walking stick fascinated me. In fact, it inspired me to start my own series ‘Man with a Hat’ that consisted of backgrounds all around Bahrain. Through the process of editing and planning this series I came to appreciate conceptual and artistic photography. Hopefully I will come up with more conceptual shots in the future. In general regarding your photography, where do you find your inspiration to create? When you take pictures, do you usually have a concept in mind of what you want to shoot, or do you let the images just "come to you", or is it both? Please describe your process. When I look back at my past, I have always considered myself a creative person whether it be when I used to paint, or decorate my house by creating a theme. I believe I have always had a creative and open mind that I wasn’t consciously aware of. I have always loved poetry, music or even a good book. I consistently looked for an escape in art during some of the roughest times of my life… I truly think my creativity stems from love and acceptance of myself, it comes from within. Do you have any favourite artists/photographers? I was introduced to a couple of famous landscape and street photographers over the past two years. I cannot say I was influenced by them to start photography but I appreciate their photos and I try to analyse and understand them. A couple of the photographers I look up to are: Henri Cartier-Bresson, Fan Ho, Vivian Maier, Ansel Adams, Michael Kenna, Takeshi Mizukoshi, Hiroshi Hamaya, Sean Tucker, Bryan Peterson and Elizabeth Gadd. Where has been your favorite place to photograph? In my lifetime, I have travelled quite a lot. Unfortunately, I did not always have my camera with me. Most times it was a family vacation and having a camera as well as 2 young children did not work out. Having said that, I had an life changing experience in the Masai Mara, Kenya. The national reserve is a whole other plane of beauty, the rugged land, the breathtaking sunrises as well as sunsets. The way the animals thrive in nature, their very existence being what makes the Earth so unique. Masai Mara is God’s canvas, everything perfect in its own way. What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? Is there any particular equipment you need or wish you had to help you achieve your photographic vision? At this moment, I use a Fuji XT4 with a Fuji 16-55 lens. In my opinion, it is quite versatile for both landscape and street photography. I don’t have a favourite focal length as I believe each frame needs to be treated differently. I recently purchased a TT artisan 35mm f1.4 manual lens and I am pleased with its outcome. Since photography is simply a hobby, I feel that whatever accessory I have is sufficient for me. Nonetheless, I hope to buy a medium format film camera later on. What are some of your goals as an artist or photographer? What direction do you think you will take your photography? Honestly, I don’t really have a fixed goal. I love photography and the endless possibilities you can achieve with it. I love the idea that you can capture anything you want with the click of a button. Hopefully, I will be able to cultivate my own unique style in due time. I wish for it to be a style that makes people understand what I am trying to portray. I hope that it can move people the way photography once moved me and led me on this everlasting journey. Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? Currently, I do not have a singular project that I am focusing on. However, I am planning to start working my way into documentary photography. I hope to one day document a series based on one single topic over a period of time. “When I am not out photographing, I (like to)…” I like to bake with my children. The process of it is extremely therapeutic to me. The idea of piecing together parts of what could be a perfect dish somewhat relaxes me. Another thing I love is reading poetry. Though I may not have the skills to write them, I go through them thoroughly trying to understand the emotions the writer evokes." Thanks Nahid! All photographs © Nahid Sultana

  • THE SOUL OF SHAPES

    Photography and words by Françoise Lerusse Interview by Melanie Meggs "Starting from design objects and architectural shapes, I explore in this series the transformative power of photography. By experimenting with light, shadows, contrasts, angles, perspectives, double exposure, I graphically reduce objects to create geometric living space, as I always start from an emotion. Tables, chairs, lamps, stairs are thus freed from their status of practical and functional objects and give way to new shapes, subjective and poetic on which the spectator in turn will project his/her emotions or his/her questions. This work of reduction, sometimes at the limits of abstraction, is freely inspired by the photographic and graphic research of the beginning of the 20th century and in particular by the work of Rodtchenko, Moholy-Nagy, El Lissitzky and also Florence Henri. Just as design and architecture aim to harmonize the human environment, I try with these photographs to create a timeless universe that can help to forget for a little while the chaos of the world." Françoise, what is the full story behind your project "Esprit des formes"? How and why did this first manifest for you? What was the inspiration? I made this series at the end of 2020 and beginning of 2021 during the covid lockdowns, at home and in the immediate surroundings. The lockdowns led me to focus on my immediate world. I have always been interested in design and architecture and the objects that surrounded me had been carefully chosen at the time I equipped my living spaces. But they were now part of my daily life, I no longer paid attention to them and I had never thought of taking them as themes for my photos. Then suddenly I became aware of their interest. At the same time, I had just bought a new camera and started to experiment with photographing the chairs, tables and lamps in the different rooms. In particular, I wanted to see how the camera handled double exposures because they are an important part of my photography. Not all digital cameras do double exposures in the same way and the result can be very different from one to another. Immediately there was... it is the case to say it...a click. I was struck by the radiant lights and the soft shadows, with a slightly film effect, and above all these images, sometimes taken very closely, tended towards abstraction. They were very geometric and graphic. I was no longer photographing objects but lines, contrasts, angles, perspectives, shapes. I felt a liberation from the reality, from the need to “say” something. I was showing spaces that “presented” themselves rather than images that represented something, spaces that were pure and alive because they conveyed my emotions. It was very inspiring for me and so I continued. What does the title "L'esprit des formes" mean? Where did it come from? "L’esprit des formes" could be translated as "The soul of shapes". This is what remains of the objects when I have reduced them to simple graphic forms. These objects are freed from their practical and functional status to become new, subjective and poetic shapes, which will in turn be interpreted by the viewer with his/her subjectivity. Talk to us about your method of working and experimenting before the final image. Did you know exactly what you wanted from the beginning? How long did each image take to create? I choose an object for its design, its lines, the shadows created by the light that surrounds it or those it produces in the case of lamps. I move it very little, essentially so that it captures the light better. I do not set the scene, I start from what I see, a bit like in instant photography, in a very intuitive way. I photograph two or three objects per session, I don't think too much, the workflow is fast and meditative at the same time. I work without stopping, as long as the inspiration is there, until I feel drained and know that I have gone to the end of the possibilities. This usually takes between half an hour and an hour. The post-treatment is the other half of the job. This is where my photographic intention becomes clearer. It represents an important step in all my work. The editing can take several days or even weeks because I need things to settle down. The whole series took me about four months, which is rather fast for me. How does your project "L’esprit des formes" differ from your previous work? Is this type of visual storytelling something you would like to pursue again in future projects? What do you think is your next chapter in your exploration with future projects. For several years I focused on metropolises, in a maximalist aesthetic full of movement, accumulation and sometimes full of colours also. This approach lasted until 2020 with the publishing of my book about Bangkok, “Chaos”. More recently I felt the need to put a distance to this chaos by concentrating on simple things in a more peaceful way. This led me to a more minimal and abstract style. I had already experimented with this kind of approach, but those works can be considered as “drafts” as they had not arrived at the succeeded stage and they lacked the emotion that I felt with "L’esprit des formes". That said, I see also a continuity between these different bodies of work. Double exposure, high contrasts, focus on lines, on geometry, on graphic aspects have always been part of my photography and I have always practiced black and white in parallel with color. In fact, in "L’esprit des formes", I take my obsession with lines and graphics to the extreme, which is ultimately nothing more than a somewhat attempt to put some order in the chaos! I will certainly pursue this. I have already started a series of still lifes in the same direction. I realized that I like to photograph inanimate objects, it is similar to studio work. I like the freedom that it gives me, the control of time, the possibility of starting over, everything that is not possible in the practice of the snapshot. But I explore other avenues also. At the moment I am developing a series that I make while traveling by car between France and Portugal. I photograph gas stations. But in fact the subject is my state of mind, the meditative emptiness that the stops in these stations lost in immense and very open landscapes provoke in me. I accompany the photos with short texts, some sorts of poems. It is also a rather minimalist work based on one color, the red. I am also continuing another project about the locality where I live in Portugal, a historical village which is now caught up by urbanization because it is close to Lisbon which is expanding. I photograph this transition with an angle on the destruction, the disappearance of nature and the loss of meaning that this brings. Finally, what do you want people to take away from these photos? What do you want them to be asking themselves? I would like them to feel an emotion, mine or theirs. I would like them to ask themselves questions about the reality of what they see. Things exist above all in our eyes so you have to put them into perspective. Having in mind that we can see things in different ways is worth much more than photography, it is a valuable asset in life in general and especially in the current world where there is so much intolerance. I would also like them to come away from the series with a sense of harmony. In the same way that design and architecture aim at harmonizing the human environment, I try with these photographs to create a timeless universe that can make people forget the chaos of the world, even if it is only for a few moments. Françoise Lerusse is a Belgian photographer living between Brussels, London, Lisbon and the South of France. After graduating in French literature, she turned to radio creation, TV journalism and film documentary. Then she joined leading international advertising agencies as a copywriter, signing campaigns that received different awards. Meanwhile she never stopped practicing amateur photography, having inherited this passion from her father. She also learned through her collaborations with advertising professional photographers. From 2014 to 2019, she followed different photography courses and workshops. She joined La Fontaine Obscure in Aix-en-Provence and participated in the “Parcours” of the Photaix Festival in 2017 with her series "Chaos". In 2018, her series "One place, different times" was part of a group exhibition at Arles Voies Off. « Chaos » was also exhibited at BNP Paribas Fortis Brussels. In February 2020 her first photobook « Dans les plis du vieux village » was published by Corridor Eléphant Editions Paris. Her second book “Chaos” was self-published in 2021.Through a poetic and expressionist approach she focuses mainly on urban spaces and human built environments. All photographs © Françoise Lerusse

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  • 2022 PHOTOGRAPHERS

    SPOTLIGHT // Vanessa Wall Stockholm, SWEDEN see portfolio explore all 2022 Photographers // AHSANUL HAQUE FAHIM ASLI GONEN BRIAN DOUGLAS ELIZABETH PAOLETTI EMIR SEVIM EMY MAIKE FRANCESCA TIBONI GABRIEL MIELES GUZMÁN GABRIELE GENTILE GIORGIO GERARDI JAN ENKELMANN JENS F. KRUSE LELE BISSOLI LEONARDO CASSI LORENZO VITALI MAARTEN VROMANS MARIËTTE AERNOUDTS MG VANDER ELST MICHÈLE POLAK NAHID SULTANA NASTPLAS NOISY KID ORNELLA LATROFA ROBERT BONK SHIRA GOLD Out of gallery

  • THE PICTORIAL-LIST | photographers

    SPOTLIGHT // Vanessa Wall Stockholm, SWEDEN see portfolio explore all All Photographers // ABBIE BRIGGS ABHAY PATEL ABHISHEK SINGH ADAM SINCLAIR ADESH GAUR ADRIAN TAN ADRIAN WHEAR AGATA LO MONACO AHMET HOJAMYRADOV ALAN THEXTON ALEX FRAYNE ALEX RUTHERFORD ALEXANDRA AVLONITIS ALEXEY STRECHEN ALICIA HABER ANDRE LOBAO ANDRES GONZALEZ ANDREW ROVENKO ANEEKA MANKU ANGEL CARNICER ANNA MARCHIOLI ANNETTE LANG ANTONIS GIAKOUMAKIS ANWAR SADAT ARTURO CAÑEDO Out of gallery

  • THE PICTORIAL-LIST | Building a community of photography

    BREAKS FROM REALITY // Mariëtte Aernoudts The magic only dreams are made of become the reality for viewers as they engage in the poetic imagery of Mariëtte Aernoudts. READ STORY // RECENT FEATURES // BREAKS FROM REALITY The magic only dreams are made of become the reality for viewers as they engage in the poetic imagery of Mariëtte Aernoudts. SEEING A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND A poet at heart, Nahid Sultana translates what she sees in her world into a kind of visual poetry that is adored. THE SOUL OF SHAPES By exploring the transformative power of photography, Francoise Lerusse graphically reduces objects to create a new geometric living space. SPATIAL LANDSCAPES The spatial landscapes Fahim has presented are a testimony to the inspiration he has found through the love of his Bangladesh community. HOUSE OF MIRRORS Through a lens of playful self-parody, Sharon Eilon aims to investigate the human experience in her home country of Israel. HOMEMADE COSMOS Leonardo Cassi's aim is to break the banality of objects by showing their hidden different faces, to create a moment of science fiction. MAKING A SPLASH Carol Dronsfield shares her portraits of the Coney Island Polar Bears, documenting over twenty two swims while getting to know the bears. SHOP BACK IN TIME Street photographer Ibi Gowon takes us back in time at the premier vintage fashion and memorabilia event, the Classic Car Boot Sale. BARE ESSENTIALS Shira Gold created a series of composite still lifes interrogating the patterns of human behavior and consumerism through Covid-19 in Canada BREAKS FROM REALITY The magic only dreams are made of become the reality for viewers as they engage in the poetic imagery of Mariëtte Aernoudts. SEEING A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND A poet at heart, Nahid Sultana translates what she sees in her world into a kind of visual poetry that is adored. THE SOUL OF SHAPES By exploring the transformative power of photography, Francoise Lerusse graphically reduces objects to create a new geometric living space. SPATIAL LANDSCAPES The spatial landscapes Fahim has presented are a testimony to the inspiration he has found through the love of his Bangladesh community. HOUSE OF MIRRORS Through a lens of playful self-parody, Sharon Eilon aims to investigate the human experience in her home country of Israel. HOMEMADE COSMOS Leonardo Cassi's aim is to break the banality of objects by showing their hidden different faces, to create a moment of science fiction. MAKING A SPLASH Carol Dronsfield shares her portraits of the Coney Island Polar Bears, documenting over twenty two swims while getting to know the bears. SHOP BACK IN TIME Street photographer Ibi Gowon takes us back in time at the premier vintage fashion and memorabilia event, the Classic Car Boot Sale. BARE ESSENTIALS Shira Gold created a series of composite still lifes interrogating the patterns of human behavior and consumerism through Covid-19 in Canada BREAKS FROM REALITY The magic only dreams are made of become the reality for viewers as they engage in the poetic imagery of Mariëtte Aernoudts. SEEING A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND A poet at heart, Nahid Sultana translates what she sees in her world into a kind of visual poetry that is adored. THE SOUL OF SHAPES By exploring the transformative power of photography, Francoise Lerusse graphically reduces objects to create a new geometric living space. SPATIAL LANDSCAPES The spatial landscapes Fahim has presented are a testimony to the inspiration he has found through the love of his Bangladesh community. HOUSE OF MIRRORS Through a lens of playful self-parody, Sharon Eilon aims to investigate the human experience in her home country of Israel. HOMEMADE COSMOS Leonardo Cassi's aim is to break the banality of objects by showing their hidden different faces, to create a moment of science fiction. MAKING A SPLASH Carol Dronsfield shares her portraits of the Coney Island Polar Bears, documenting over twenty two swims while getting to know the bears. SHOP BACK IN TIME Street photographer Ibi Gowon takes us back in time at the premier vintage fashion and memorabilia event, the Classic Car Boot Sale. BARE ESSENTIALS Shira Gold created a series of composite still lifes interrogating the patterns of human behavior and consumerism through Covid-19 in Canada BREAKS FROM REALITY The magic only dreams are made of become the reality for viewers as they engage in the poetic imagery of Mariëtte Aernoudts. SEEING A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND A poet at heart, Nahid Sultana translates what she sees in her world into a kind of visual poetry that is adored. THE SOUL OF SHAPES By exploring the transformative power of photography, Francoise Lerusse graphically reduces objects to create a new geometric living space. SPATIAL LANDSCAPES The spatial landscapes Fahim has presented are a testimony to the inspiration he has found through the love of his Bangladesh community. HOUSE OF MIRRORS Through a lens of playful self-parody, Sharon Eilon aims to investigate the human experience in her home country of Israel. HOMEMADE COSMOS Leonardo Cassi's aim is to break the banality of objects by showing their hidden different faces, to create a moment of science fiction. MAKING A SPLASH Carol Dronsfield shares her portraits of the Coney Island Polar Bears, documenting over twenty two swims while getting to know the bears. SHOP BACK IN TIME Street photographer Ibi Gowon takes us back in time at the premier vintage fashion and memorabilia event, the Classic Car Boot Sale. BARE ESSENTIALS Shira Gold created a series of composite still lifes interrogating the patterns of human behavior and consumerism through Covid-19 in Canada Out of gallery see more >>> SEEING A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND // by Nahid Sultana A poet at heart, Nahid Sultana translates what she sees in her world into a kind of visual poetry that is adored. READ INTERVIEW // FROM THE ARCHIVES // THE WONDERS OF EVERYDAY LIFE Through her work Anna Marchioli communicates her feelings as she faces the wonders in the pieces of her everyday life. HER WONDERLAND Mara captures that moody, dark and dramatic atmosphere reflective of the film noir cinematography. SPECTACULAR VISIONS We chat with our Editor in Chief, Karin Svadlenak who has developed a passion for photography in recent years. We talk about her journey. THE BEAUTY OF THE URBAN UNIVERSE Capturing the beauty of the urban universe, French photographer David Quevillart wants to make pictures that tell stories. THE GESSLER PERSPECTIVE With his distinctive style of super angles and super low perspectives, Jan Gessler's love for photography began at an early age. THE STREET FILES John St's passion for street photography has opened up a door and taken him down a path that he never thought was possible. THE HUMAN PRESENCE Maximilian Haidacher is a visual artist who shows through his images, how humans have reshaped and utilised space in our civilised world. LET THERE BE LIGHT Kevin Icabales' photos are usually of humorous and unusual scenes. His love for candid moments led him down the path to street photography. AN OBSERVED REALISM Inspired by her local relaxed beach lifestyle in Australia, Melanie's photographs combine an observed realism with a touch of quirkiness. HEART AND SOUL For Sofia Sitnikiene, photography is her medium of choice to express her artistic vision for documenting life as it unfolds. A CREATIVE PERSPECTIVE Fine art photographer Ingrid Clauwaert is a light searcher, impulsive and passionate, always looking for a creative perspective. HARMONY OF CONTRASTS Adrian Tan is a passionate street photographer living in Singapore, he is fascinated by dark shadows and blown out highlights. THE WONDERS OF EVERYDAY LIFE Through her work Anna Marchioli communicates her feelings as she faces the wonders in the pieces of her everyday life. HER WONDERLAND Mara captures that moody, dark and dramatic atmosphere reflective of the film noir cinematography. SPECTACULAR VISIONS We chat with our Editor in Chief, Karin Svadlenak who has developed a passion for photography in recent years. We talk about her journey. THE BEAUTY OF THE URBAN UNIVERSE Capturing the beauty of the urban universe, French photographer David Quevillart wants to make pictures that tell stories. THE GESSLER PERSPECTIVE With his distinctive style of super angles and super low perspectives, Jan Gessler's love for photography began at an early age. THE STREET FILES John St's passion for street photography has opened up a door and taken him down a path that he never thought was possible. THE HUMAN PRESENCE Maximilian Haidacher is a visual artist who shows through his images, how humans have reshaped and utilised space in our civilised world. LET THERE BE LIGHT Kevin Icabales' photos are usually of humorous and unusual scenes. His love for candid moments led him down the path to street photography. AN OBSERVED REALISM Inspired by her local relaxed beach lifestyle in Australia, Melanie's photographs combine an observed realism with a touch of quirkiness. HEART AND SOUL For Sofia Sitnikiene, photography is her medium of choice to express her artistic vision for documenting life as it unfolds. A CREATIVE PERSPECTIVE Fine art photographer Ingrid Clauwaert is a light searcher, impulsive and passionate, always looking for a creative perspective. HARMONY OF CONTRASTS Adrian Tan is a passionate street photographer living in Singapore, he is fascinated by dark shadows and blown out highlights. THE WONDERS OF EVERYDAY LIFE Through her work Anna Marchioli communicates her feelings as she faces the wonders in the pieces of her everyday life. HER WONDERLAND Mara captures that moody, dark and dramatic atmosphere reflective of the film noir cinematography. SPECTACULAR VISIONS We chat with our Editor in Chief, Karin Svadlenak who has developed a passion for photography in recent years. We talk about her journey. THE BEAUTY OF THE URBAN UNIVERSE Capturing the beauty of the urban universe, French photographer David Quevillart wants to make pictures that tell stories. THE GESSLER PERSPECTIVE With his distinctive style of super angles and super low perspectives, Jan Gessler's love for photography began at an early age. THE STREET FILES John St's passion for street photography has opened up a door and taken him down a path that he never thought was possible. THE HUMAN PRESENCE Maximilian Haidacher is a visual artist who shows through his images, how humans have reshaped and utilised space in our civilised world. LET THERE BE LIGHT Kevin Icabales' photos are usually of humorous and unusual scenes. His love for candid moments led him down the path to street photography. AN OBSERVED REALISM Inspired by her local relaxed beach lifestyle in Australia, Melanie's photographs combine an observed realism with a touch of quirkiness. HEART AND SOUL For Sofia Sitnikiene, photography is her medium of choice to express her artistic vision for documenting life as it unfolds. A CREATIVE PERSPECTIVE Fine art photographer Ingrid Clauwaert is a light searcher, impulsive and passionate, always looking for a creative perspective. HARMONY OF CONTRASTS Adrian Tan is a passionate street photographer living in Singapore, he is fascinated by dark shadows and blown out highlights. Out of gallery see more >>> JOIN OUR COMMUNITY // © Maarten Vroman Follow us on Instagram // BE DISCOVERED // If you are a photographer with a photo story to share then we would love to see it! Artistic or lyrical; social or political; new or old; anything! We want to help support you and the work you create. Share your photography projects with us. Submit NOW © Bill Lacey

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