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  • UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM | IN CONVERSATION WITH BARBARA PEACOCK

    INTERVIEW July 4, 2023 UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM REFLECTIONS ON THE NATURE OF LIFE Photography by Barbara Peacock Interview by Karen Ghostlaw Pomarico Barbara Peacock is an assignment photographer living in Portland, Maine. She studied fine arts at Boston University School of Fine Arts, and photography and filmmaking at The School for the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University. She began as a street photographer and gradually became an assignment lifestyle photographer. Barbara began finding the threads of her hometown tapestry with a project that began in 1982 culminating with a published book in 2015, ‘Hometown’. A thirty-year photographic project that explores the community of the small town where she grew up and continued to live as an adult, Westford Massachusetts. Her photography examines life as she lived it, through the valued personal experiences with people she interacted and worked with, socially engaging on a day-to-day basis. We often walk through our daily lives, without paying close attention to the people we encounter, and the valuable contributions they make to our existence, even in their simplicity. While documenting community events and daily life Barbara exposes the simple realities that help shape the way we engage the world. She asks us to not just look but to see the important contributions inspired by the community. She asks us to open our eyes, as well as our hearts, respect old traditions, while we discover and make new ones, admire our neighbors, and lead with a handshake. Barbara gives back to her community through her visual storytelling, becoming an important thread in the fabric of her community. We have the privilege of sharing Barbara’s current project, which was started in 2016, inspiring the book: American Bedroom - Reflections on the Nature of Life. This exploration is an anthropological examination of American culture spanning across the continental United States of America. Barbara invites us into one of the most sacred and private spaces where humanity exists. Where the door is often closed, securing the contents and protecting the intimacy we nourish as individuals, and share as partners, or families. It is where we dream, celebrate our personal triumphs, nourishing our bodies and minds. It is the space and place we retreat to in times of despair, where we heal from sickness, repair emotionally, replenish when depleted, finding absolute comfort in. ‘American Bedroom’ stories open the door respectfully, giving the subjects the opportunity to authentically communicate this intimacy honestly and openly, unreservedly. ‘American Bedroom’ breaks through the many barriers we create in our society. Barbara opens the door of a bedroom, illuminating the intimate thoughts, revealed through the bodies and souls of her subjects. The naked truth is open for interpretation, and inspiration. The confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject are unique, allowing the photograph to exist, without feeling like it has been created. Its powerful message lies in the authenticity of the moments shared between the photographer and subjects; this is the magic that Barbara shares with us. We are grateful to have the opportunity to ask Barbara about the connections she has made and the contributions she offers to help define humanity through her photography in the landscape of the American Bedroom. “When physical bedroom doors are opened to me there is a veil of religion, politics, and ideologies that is mysteriously and magically lifted. What remains, is the bare soul of human life, a story, and purity of heart that rises like cream to the top. This is not a look at our differences, although there may be many, it is about our likenesses, our loves, our dreams, and all the threads of commonality that connect us as human beings.” IN CONVERSATION WITH BARBARA PEACOCK THE PICTORIAL LIST: Hello Barbara, thank you for your time, and for your candor answering our questions. We find your work to be a powerful statement about American culture in the 21st century. Please tell our readers a little about Barbara Peacock, where you are from, and your connection to your community. BARBARA PEACOCK: I live in a small town in Maine outside of Portland. I moved here six years ago before that I lived in Massachusetts for all of my life. I had a portrait studio in a very small town, so I knew everyone, and it was a nice community where I photographed the people for over 30 years while I was raising my children and working as a professional photographer. My first body of work was called ‘Hometown’ which was a documentary about the town I grew up. My community up here in Maine has much closer ties to my immediate family and a few local families that I’ve met and become close to. TPL: When did you first pick up a camera, when was it obvious you were not going to put it down? Who was your biggest influence in the way you see through your lens? BP: I first picked up a brownie camera when I was four or five years old and took pictures of the family pets and my siblings. My dad had a 35mm camera which he would not allow me to use until I turned 16, but there are pictures of me running with that camera and bringing it to him. I think he was in the garden and wanted to photograph something and had me go get it, so I love that picture because it shows a determined young girl. I kept asking my father if I could get a 35mm camera, when I was a little bit older, he said that if I earned half the money, he would pay the other half. When I was about 14, I got a job in a bakery for the Summer and saved all my money and at the end of the Summer, my dad and I drove into Boston and I picked out my first camera, which was a Canon camera with a 50mm lens. When I was in high school, we had a dark room and a really enthusiastic art teacher that I really connected with, he was a great influence. He taught us how to process black-and-white film, and how to print it, and I ended up as the high school photographer for the yearbook. After that, I went to art school and it was mostly drawing, painting, and sculpture for two years as photography was not part of that curriculum. Since I missed photography quite a bit, I transferred to the Museum School in Boston where I could do photography and filmmaking. I had already been influenced by the photographs in ‘The Family of Man’ by Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans but now at the new school, I was introduced to Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Frank, Eugene Smith, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Gary Winograd etc., and I was taken by street photography. Although I worked as a commercial photographer for many years, I continued to pursue shooting ‘Hometown’ in the pure style and adherence of the school of street photography. Eventually, I was able to study with Mary Ellen Mark, Eugene Richards, and Ernesto Bazan. TPL: What was your first connection to the community, even as a little girl? What was the spark that ignited this fire that has become an inspirational element that has become the backbone and structure of your work? BP: The spark was what I mentioned above about my dad having this camera, and the fact that we had these brownie cameras around the house with black and white film, and every once in a while, little photographs with scalloped edges, would appear on the kitchen table and my brothers and I would gather around completely fascinated. So, for me, it all started back then. It seemed magical and I was completely connected to it. But also, I think the fact that I was so connected to our small town was because I walked everywhere as a kid (Back then we used to walk everywhere, my mom never gave us a ride even in snowstorms!). As I said in Hometown “The very essence of the town penetrated my soul through the soles of my feet.” So, when it was time to build a body of work, I decided to turn my camera to what I knew which was my ‘Hometown.’ 'Laverne and James' © Barbara Peacock 'Claire and Tee' © Barbara Peacock 'Cai and Claire' © Barbara Peacock 'Sonia' © Barbara Peacock 'Alexander and Grace' © Barbara Peacock 'Dale' © Barbara Peacock 'Micah and Kody' © Barbara Peacock 'Chloe' © Barbara Peacock TPL: Tell us more about the diversity in what you photograph. What are the Pros and Cons of flexibility required to successfully achieve this. What is the constant or connecting thread you have found throughout all the frames you have constructed? BP: It’s always about people and being open to their stories and lives. In the case of ‘Hometown’ I was more of a fly on the wall, trying to capture life as it unfolded in front of me. In that case it was more of a casual head nod or a conversation after the fact. For ‘American Bedroom’, once someone was willing to allow me to come into their bedroom it more or less became what I call ‘a song and a dance.’ By that I mean the song is keeping a conversation going while I assess the light and address the technical, (you have to make it look easy and seamless). The ‘dance’ part is to keep that going while I shoot so they become less nervous or self-aware. The pros are that I have had the opportunity to meet so many people who open up about their lives so they can tell their story for the world to see. There really aren’t many cons since all of this is an incredibly privileged and humbling experience and opportunity. Once in a while, I travel a long way to photograph someone who ghosts me, but that kind of thing happens. You have to stay focused on the project as a whole and not allow yourself to get dragged down by the bumps in the road. The constant thread with all the images I have taken is the storytelling of human lives. TPL: Your photography that we have shared focuses on the fabric of American society. You find common threads that create unique patterns weaving an authentic tapestry of American culture. Barbara, please introduce your project ‘American Bedroom’ to us. What inspired the concept for ‘American Bedroom’? BP: The genesis of ‘American Bedroom’ began one spring morning when I was looking out my bedroom window to view my garden. When I turned, I saw my husband wrapped up in bed linens, bathed in low amber light, looking like a Renaissance painting. The caveat was his snore mask which created a dichotomy of the classical and the contemporary. I chuckled a little, as I sat back in bed with my coffee ‘Rebirth of naturalism’ from art history was spinning around my head. I began to complete the scene in my head as to where and how I would be if this was a photograph. Then my mind began to consider the contents of our bed stands with books, water, sleep aids, notebooks for midnight thoughts, and the coffee ring stains. I thought, in a non-secular way, God is in the details. My eyes drifted to my dresser with family photos of the kids and pets, ceramic birds that were my mother's, and a jewelry box where I knew there were treasured love notes from my children tucked away for bittersweet walks down memory lane. TPL: Talk us through the narrative of ‘American Bedroom’ - what journey are you taking us on? What is the full story behind the project? BP: The story behind ‘American Bedroom’ is the people. I am taking you on the journey one bedroom at a time, while the people are completing the journey with their stories. This is a glimpse of America and Americans at this time in our history. TPL: After the concept, what was the process you went through to make this a real project? What are some successes, and what are some learning curves, or advice you can share that was a valuable lesson you learned? BP: After I formed the initial concept, I asked friends and family what they thought of the idea. Everyone was enthusiastic about it. I began to ask people if they would be my subject and to my amazement some said yes. My first photograph for ‘American Bedroom’ was of a young girl named Jessica. I met her at an outdoor flea market. She gave me her name on a little piece of paper. About a month went by and I finally made a date to photograph her. I knew several things before I started. I knew it would be a wide lens so I could get all of life’s little details in the frame, (the whole project was shot with a 24mm lens). I also knew I would be using a tripod since I would often be in low-light situations. It is also important to mention that ‘American Bedroom’ is not a true documentary, but more of a melding of photography and painting - and that I would allow myself to move things and potentially help the subject’s pose. Jessica was beginner's luck in a lot of ways. I created my first image exactly how I imagined it. I began sharing the images on social media - Facebook and Instagram. People responded positively and enthusiastically. I continued shooting locally and then made my first journey to The South. Once I had about 15 strong images I applied for grants. In 2017 I won the Getty Editorial Grant, and the project was off and running. There is much I have learned. Too much to put down here but I think the most profound thing I learned was that I became a conduit for the voice of the people and that the project was much bigger than me. Also, it was key to use social media to get the work out into the world. The project gained international attention and has been written about in approximately 30-40 feature articles. I have been interviewed for 3 podcasts, have had two museum shows, and sold prints to collectors. In the end, this did not equate to book sales. There was some kind of disconnect. My advice is to try hard to get gallery representation. Both here and in Europe. And, to broaden the reach beyond photographers. TPL: How did you find your willing subjects? Was there a selection process you went through? Talk to us about your method and experimentation before the final images in your project. Did you know how you wanted the project to look? How long did each image take to create? BP: Initially, I photographed family and friends and local willing subjects. To broaden my search, I would post on Facebook / Instagram where I was traveling to and ask folks if they had any connections there. Once on location I would go to small towns and find local diners, hair salons, and hardware stores, where everyone knew everyone. Often, I would leave small cards that had a little about the project and my contact info. I would meet people along the way, and they knew people. So, there were a myriad of ways to meet willing subjects. Most sessions last about an hour. I try to always shoot from two different angles. I don’t experiment more than that. As I said previously, I use one lens - a 24mm. There is so much going on within the 4 walls and the subject(s) that my concentration is mainly on how to create the strongest composition, harness the best light and tell this human story uniquely. I often made a habit of having coffee or taking them out to eat or just talking for a long while. Another thing I learned is that there are a lot of lonely people who would like someone to sit with, to stay a little longer. Once I am processing the images, I look at each image for expression, gesture, and focus. I choose my selections by giving them a 2-star. When I go back for round two, (usually a few days later), I then give my favorites a 3 star. I review those and pick anywhere from one to three images, and these give a 4 star. Once I have the subject's personal statement, I share an image on social media. Sometimes there is clearly one winning image that stands out and that is always wonderful. TPL: What is your take away from your visual story exploration? What have you learned about the American Bedroom? What do you wish readers to learn through your photography? BP: Yesterday I was telling a woman I had just met, a few of the background stories of two of the people I have photographed. She got goosebumps and teared up. She held herself tight for a few moments and this was without seeing the photographs. I think such raw and authentic human emotion is one of the most beautiful things on this earth. It is pure and real and can never be denied. These stories are humanistic tales of living in this country, at this time. I hope to not only give these people a voice but to give them, (and those like them), the power to be seen and to speak deeply to the viewer to gain empathy, emotion, and a silent respectful communion. For those suffering, growing, lost, addicted, alone, loving, learning, grieving, yearning, dreaming, and even content, there is a fellow kinship and identity that holds power. The power found in human connection. 'Laura and Spencer' © Barbara Peacock 'Hope and Kurt' © Barbara Peacock 'Jessica' © Barbara Peacock 'Pepere' © Barbara Peacock 'MEK' © Barbara Peacock 'Kalastas Family' © Barbara Peacock 'The Layfayette Family' © Barbara Peacock 'Billy' © Barbara Peacock 'The Mathews Family' © Barbara Peacock TPL: Share with our community why projects are important, what have they brought to your work? Was the first step the hardest? What was the first step? Is there a last step? BP: Projects are important for the soul of the creator and for the audience. If you are an artist, of any type, you simply need to create. It is hardly a choice. It is how we live our lives. It is what allows us to breathe. That might sound dramatic, but it is quite true. The observer is allowed to use their curiosity and imagination to view work and form their opinions. It can open worlds for people who may not have had an opportunity to experience something firsthand or would not have the proclivity to do so, to begin with. The first step is simply doing something. Take a chance. Formulate the idea and then begin. I’m not sure if the hardest step is the first, but rather when you are in the middle of a big project it can become difficult to go on. There are conclusions to projects. Creating a book for a body of work is more or less a final step. There may be gallery and museum shows and book signings, but the creating of imagery for the project - that part is over. TPL: What projects do you have planned for the future? Will American culture be the inspiration? BP: Yes. There will be one more American story to complete a trilogy of American projects. I don’t have the total concept down, but it will be centered on women. TPL: When you are not out making these connections through your photography, what is Barbara doing? Do you escape to your bedroom? What does Barbara’s bedroom say about Barbara? What might we be surprised to find? BP: My home and my family are my lifeline. I am married and we have three wonderful grown sons. We are fortunate to live in close proximity to them. Our lives overlap all the time, and it is truly a blessing. I’ve done nothing more important in my life than to give life. I have some lovely flower gardens and my office looks over a deck with flowers, birds, and hummingbirds that come and go all day. In the winter my world is full of beautiful snowfalls. I love to read, draw and paint and I am always at peace when I find the time to do so. I also have written a few screenplays and hope to direct a film next year. I listen to a huge variety of music; it is incredibly important to me. I have playlists for all different times of the day with everything from classical, jazz to rock. You will always find my bed made with pretty pillows. My bedroom is light, airy, and pretty. I don't spend much time there, but I like it to be comfortable and pleasant and welcoming for an occasional afternoon nap with a book and my cat, and for nighttime sleeping. We cannot say enough about Barbara and her thoughtful and brilliant work. We would like to give her a shout out for her diligence and generous contribution founding a not-profit organization in 2010, ‘The Nightingale Project’. This project has inspired and supported the artistic nurturing of needy individuals through art and photography providing the opportunity and new vision, to some who thirsted for her influence. It is a traveling program with a variety of ages that are supported, with a mix of people from adults and high school. The journeys so far have included Haiti, Cambodia, and New York. We look forward to watching her program grow, and watching the influence she has on the eyes of the future. Barbara Peacock has worked with clients all over the world in many different ways. Commercial clients include Arm & Hammer, Coca-Cola, Disney, Toyota, Volkswagen & Nickelodeon and more. Editorial clients include People, Newsweek, Real Simple, Family Circle, Oprah, Family Fun. Barbara is a highly awarded photographer and has exhibited internationally, giving Barabara the ability to continue her studies and produce her important work. Follow her links to her website and social media for more information and continued inspiration. You can preorder a personal copy of ‘American Bedroom’ from Barbara’s website and help support the continuation of her important work exploring and helping to define American culture in our contemporary society. VIEW BARBARA'S PORTFOLIO Website >>> Instagram >>> Linkedin >>> read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • THE BEAUTY WITHIN MY HOMETOWN | IN CONVERSATION WITH YVES VAN TENTE

    INTERVIEW July 22, 2020 THE BEAUTY WITHIN MY HOMETOWN ​ Photography by Yves Van Tente Interview by Melanie Meggs In a world of ever-evolving technologies and opportunities, it can be difficult for a person to navigate the myriad of options available and find their true calling. But for Yves Van Tente, a photographer from Belgium living in Antwerp, it was a journey of self-discovery and unlocking his creative potential. Yves doesn’t simply see photography as a mere technology but as an art form that allows him to explore the power of color, light, shadow and the human element to create captivating visuals that evoke strong emotion. His creative journey has only just begun, but already it promises to be a truly inspiring one. “I only started with photography 'seriously' a couple of years ago. Before that I basically only took snapshots and some pictures during vacations, until my partner pointed out that she really liked my pictures and that I had the eye. It took me a while to believe it but I knew that I liked to take pictures and in 2017, I bought myself a small camera to fit the camera bag that I had bought earlier simply because I liked it. From that point my photography journey started, to discover what kind of photography I really liked, and little by little I developed a true passion for a street style type of photography.” IN CONVERSATION WITH YVES VAN TENTE THE PICTORIAL LIST: Yves, where do you find your inspiration to photograph? YVES VAN TENTE: Initially I found my inspiration on Instagram and Flickr. Currently I still get a lot of inspiration from those social media but see it a lot broader now and very much pay attention to any kind of visual media such as movies. It is fantastic to see how the use of colour, light and shadow influences the mood and feeling you get from a movie scene for instance. Finally I am always in the mood for a nice book and have a couple of photo books on the coffee table to flip through. TPL: How has your style of photographing evolved since you first started? YVT: I hope it will keep on evolving. Photography is an art and the journey in this art form is never over. Fairly quickly I felt that going on the street and capturing the beauty of the urban environment with a human touch was something that really attracted me. Going on the street is very therapeutic for me, as it confronts me with myself all the time and while doing these photo-walk sessions I am getting to know myself better, which is as such influencing my style constantly. TPL: Where is your favourite place(s) to photograph? YVT: Definitely my home town Antwerp. Although I like to travel and capture those street moods abroad, I can still discover beauty in my home town and very often even just around the corner in my own neighbourhood. The Central Station of Antwerp is also one of my favourite spots and you can find me there regularly. The place is so beautiful and vibrant, and as the light is always different you can always find new angles. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? YVT: There are so many photographers out there that produce such impressive work. Some Antwerp based photographers such as Marc Pennartz and Antwerpist have my deepest respect as they can capture people’s life in glimpses and moods so beautifully. At this moment my photography journey seems to be in a light/shadow phase and in this ‘discipline’ I get a lot of inspiration from the work of Sean Tucker, Mark Fearnley and Alan Schaller but, I also like a lot the colorful work of Evan Ranft and Josh K Jackson. Finally, I adore the work of Fan Ho and I am studying the masters from Magnum Photos (Carl De Keyzer; Harry Gruyere; Constantine Manos;...) TPL: Do you think equipment is important in achieving your vision in your photography? What would you say to someone just starting out? YVT: Equipment is important in the sense that you need to love your camera and know it thoroughly. It needs to make you go out and shoot. Besides that every camera has its limitations but there are no bad cameras. It is important not to get trapped in the thinking that a better camera will take/make better pictures. For me it is important that a camera is compact and not too heavy as I don't want to carry around heavy bags. ​ ​ I am an open minded person that is rather open to try out new experiences. I get easily bored when there is no feeling of progress anymore, so I need to try out new things regularly to keep on evolving. TPL: What characteristics do you think you need to become a photographer? What’s your tips or advice for someone in your genre? YVT: I don't think you become a photographer. It is a passion/gift that you discover at a given point. It is important to be passionate and go out shooting as much as you can. You really need to have a passion for it, and if that is the case you do whatever it takes to create your work. For my type of photography you just have to go out and have a couple of projects/themes in your head. That way you at least know what you are looking for when on a photo harvesting tour, as I call it myself. Also you need to have an open mind and make the best of the given circumstances (mainly light and weather conditions) for your captures. As an example: it is difficult to make hard contrast pictures on a overcast or foggy day, but you can capture great moods during foggy weather. TPL: Have you ever been involved in the arts before photography? YVT: No, not at all actually. Professionally I am the total opposite of an artist, as I hold an engineering degree and I am working in the telecom industry. So for me, practicing an art where there is no right or wrong is very liberating and therapeutic. ​ ​ TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on? YVT: I am still in the process of collecting a body of work, but already exploring and thinking about setting up a website where I can maybe offer my best work for sale. I am anyhow not in a hurry as I still have the rest of my life to further develop. TPL: If I wasn't photographing what would I be doing?... YVT: As I am also very passionate about music, maybe I could find a similar passion in the creation of electronic soundscapes. Maybe something to explore in the future... ​ ​ Yves Van Tente's story is a testament to the power of creativity and the courage to travel the path of self-discovery. By embracing the ever-evolving opportunities and technologies, Yves has been able to unlock his potential and create captivating visuals that evoke emotion. His journey has only just begun, and following his creative journey will surely be an inspiration to us all. VIEW YVES'S PORTFOLIO read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • MY VISUAL DIARY | IN CONVERSATION WITH LUCA STRIPPOLI

    INTERVIEW June 7, 2020 MY VISUAL DIARY ​ Photography by Luca Strippoli Interview by Melanie Meggs Discover the captivating work of Luca Strippoli, an award-winning Italian street photographer whose passionate improvisations capture the emotion of his subjects and ignite the imagination. His stunning black and white photos embody a visual diary of his feelings, yet his remarkable talent transcends beyond the boundaries of monochrome imagery - his vivid, thought-provoking colour compositions evoke a sense of creativity, daring us to look beyond the literal and embrace the unexpected. Luca's remarkable talent challenges us to be bold and decisive with our camera shutter and to explore new, exciting perspectives. “I like to define myself a passionate improviser. Photography is, from my point of view, a kind of diary, I talk of myself through others.” IN CONVERSATION WITH LUCA STRIPPOLI THE PICTORIAL LIST: Luca, when did you start getting interested in photography? LUCA STRIPPOLI: I’ve studied graphics when I was younger and I have always been fascinated by art and images. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? LS: Wandering in the streets, visiting a museum, listening to music…in my opinion inspiration can come from different situations...it can be an unusual light beam, a detail, an interesting backlight or trivially a street scene I must portray. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? LS: I try to take pictures my way, with all the limits. Photographing is like writing for a writer, you can use a typewriter, a word processor, a pencil…but what counts the most are the words. However, between my favorite photographers my beloved ones are Mario Giacomelli, for his landscapes and people; Elliott Erwitt, storyteller of meaningful little stories; Sebastiao Salgado, with his amazing frames and; finally Henri Cartier-Bresson, a photography aesthete. TPL: Has your style of shooting changed since you first started? LS: Absolutely. I’ve understood that photography was becoming more and more part of my life when I introduced people in my photos. I was then aware of my emotional participation in everything included in the composition of the picture. TPL: Where is your favourite place to shoot? LS: I like wandering without a destination. It’s the first symptom of a disease called photography…I stray in the city just to catch little stories, fragments of life that ordinary life gives to me. I don’t know the subjects but in that moment they become unconsciously my models. ​ ​ Photographing is like writing for a writer, you can use a typewriter, a word processor, a pencil…but what counts the most are the words. TPL: What characteristics do you think you need to become a 'good' photographer? What’s your tips or advice for someone in your genre? LS: The continuous bombing of photos we are getting used to on social media, without an adequate visual education that can provide the right tools to correctly evaluate an image, can now destabilize how we judge a shot. Therefore, to emerge now as a photographer has become even harder, but I like thinking there is still a place where talented people sooner or later will be valued and acknowledged for their work. TPL: Have you ever been involved in the arts before photography? LS: No TPL: Do you think equipment is important in achieving your vision in your photography? What would you say to someone just starting out? LS: The equipment I am using right now is the smartphone but in the past I have used several kinds of equipment. Nowadays, I need something to catch the moment immediately and here the smartphone comes into play because you always have it in your pocket...simple to use and fast to catch the best timing in a specific moment. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? LS: I have just started a project about photo composition, many photos balanced to create a singular one. TPL: "If I wasn't photographing what would I be doing?... LS: I would come back to paint." ​ ​ Luca's work is a captivating invitation to explore a new world of photography. His inspiring photography encourages us to challenge ourselves and look for new perspectives. To further discover the captivating work of Luca Strippoli, connect with him today and be inspired by his work. VIEW LUCA'S PROFILE Luca's website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • WHAT STRIKES A CHORD | IN CONVERSATION WITH JOSE MARCO LULL

    INTERVIEW October 21, 2020 WHAT STRIKES A CHORD ​ Photography by Jose Marco Lull Interview by Melanie Meggs With a camera in hand, Jose Marco Lull has been on a journey of visual exploration for more than three decades. Since the early days of taking photographs of friends and family and capturing the beauty of his travels, he has developed a keen eye for detail and spontaneity. After a break from photography, Lull has returned to his passion with an enthusiasm for street photography, immersing himself into the bustling hustle of big city streets and uncovering the unique stories and characters that lie beneath its surface. Now based in Valencia, Spain, Lull is a self-taught photographer whose work is focused on capturing the spirit of the people and places he visits, one frame at a time. “The human element. I try to include it in almost all my photographs. Photography for me is life, and the human element makes it even more alive.” IN CONVERSATION WITH JOSE MARCO LULL TPL: Jose please tell us more about yourself. When did you start getting in to photography? JML: I am a 57-year-old self-taught amateur photographer living in Valencia. Until the age of 40 I was working in photo labs and doing some reportages on my own. Now I work as a civil servant in the Valencian Government Administration. I bought my first camera at age 20, a second-hand Nikon F2 that I still have and since then I have been taking photos, mostly travel photography, nature and some underwater photography as well. The switch to digital photography was a bit traumatic for me and I did not take photos for several years. Later in 2016 I bought a Fuji X series and started doing street photography, something that I had always liked but never done until then. Now it is almost the only genre that I practice. TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? JML: There is nothing in particular that is my source of inspiration. I see a lot of photography, the internet, books, exhibitions...I guess it is a mixture of all those impressions that remain in my head. TPL: Is there anything you want to express through your photography? And what are some of the elements you always try to include in your photographs? JML: I don't want to express anything in particular with my photography. I think that a good photo is the one that causes an impact, a strong emotional reaction in the viewer, be it laughter, grief, guilt, astonishment...if I succeed, I am satisfied. TPL: Do you prefer to shoot alone or with friends? JML: I prefer to go out to take photos alone, you are more focused on what you do. Photography is like a form of meditation for me. You go out into the street and your mind stops thinking, you are only attentive to what is happening around you and you try to capture the moment where everything comes together. Although sometimes it is good to have someone with you, sometimes you go unnoticed if you are in company. TPL: Who are your favourite artists and photographers? JML: I have been inspired by many authors but especially the "classics", Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand, Elliott Erwitt (I love Erwitt) Robert Frank, Vivian Maier, Jill Freedman...the great documentary maker Sebastiao Salgado...an endless list! Spaniards like Ramón Masat, Pérez-Siquier, García Rodero, Koldo Chamorro...And photographers that I have discovered on Instagram such as Vineet Vohra, Cedric Roux, Eric Kogan, Nina Kling, Ximena Echague, Felicia Olivares... ​ ​ Be yourself, everyone else is already taken. - Oscar Wilde TPL: Where is your favourite place to photograph? JML: Although "everything can be photographed" and inspiration can arise anywhere, my favourite place is the streets of big cities. I like that mix of diverse people and the great amount of stimuli that you have around you in a big city. TPL: How does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? What would you say to someone wanting to start out in your genre of photography? JML: I use Fuji X series cameras. I like them because of the lightness and quality of their lenses. I also like its vintage style. My favourite focal length (in full frame equivalent) is 50 mm. It allows me to be further away from the scene and not disturb the moment, I prefer to go unnoticed, but I also use the 28 mm when I need it. I would advise someone starting out in street photography to always carry a camera with them, a small one with a fixed lens (I try to always carry my X100T with me), and to look at a lot of photography, painting, cinema, etc., and not to try to copy anyone, being yourself. TPL: Are there any special projects you are currently working on that you would like to let everyone know about? JML: I don't have any projects in mind. I am not much of a planner. I go out and photograph what at that moment "strikes a chord". Maybe later I can put together several photographs and form something that works as a whole. But I am not saying that in the future I will not (have a project). TPL: What are some of your goals as an artist? Where do you see yourself or hope to see yourself in five years? JML: My goal as an artist is to feel good about myself doing what I do and try to make others enjoy it. I do not try to transmit or tell anything with my photographs, I simply show the beauty of the everyday, of ordinary people, of those moments or instants that go unnoticed in the eyes of most people and that photography has the power to freeze in time and thus is able to show. In five years I hope to be taking better photos than now, and publishing a book would be nice, but I think that will take more than five years. TPL: "When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… JML: I usually train Aikido, an international martial art to keep the mind relaxed and the body active." ​ ​ With a passion for street photography, Jose Marco Lull captures the unique human element of big city streets. If you are interested in getting to know Jose and his work better, connect with him through the links below. VIEW JOSE'S PORTFOLIO Jose's instagram >>> read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • WELCOME TO STREET LIFE | IN CONVERSATION WITH THE CREATORS BEHIND THE STREETLIFE PODCAST: JOHN ST. & MARK J. DAVIDSON

    INTERVIEW December 21, 2022 WELCOME TO STREET LIFE ​ Introduction by Karen Ghostlaw Pomarico Interview by Melanie Meggs STREET LIFE is a street photography podcast filling a void in the podcast world of photography. It is hosted by two photographers, John St (aka Giant_Evertonian) and Mark Davidson. Together they share the passion for street photography, and have a comradery and chemistry that makes for interesting discussions with street photographers in the industry. They share their thoughts and opinions on a diverse range of topics as well as engage with well respected professionals in the industry, while highlighting some inspirational less known street photographers making their mark in the field today. Each artist is different, giving them great material for asking brilliant questions that create meaningful dialogue, that one can learn from and apply to how they may approach their own work. With a casual feel, their quick wit and charm make the exchanges with their guests not only informative, but delightful and easy to listen to. Both John and Mark are Australian based photographers, but reside in different cities along the southern coast of Australia. About a day's drive between them. What started off as mutual respect for each other's work on Instagram, eventually turned into a meet and greet in John’s city of Adelaide, where they inspired each other's work on the street, and where the interactive personal exchanges became a unique and comfortable dialogue between them, and where the magic of their chemistry began. Much of their work together is done online, giving them the ability to give this project the attention it deserves and requires. They started this endeavour with no expectations, and only short term goals, that have already surpassed the initial targets they’d loosely set at the beginning of the project. The street photography community has embraced their podcast series, finding it to check a lot of the boxes they felt were missing in the photographic podcast community. Tune in to their interview below and find out more about what is making this podcast so successful. “We get lots of comments about how well we compliment each other and our on air ‘chemistry’. I'm not really sure where our chemistry comes from to be honest. I guess we have a similar sense of humour, beliefs and our moral compass points in a similar direction which all go to make a solid foundation. I believe you cross paths with particular people at different stages in your life. You never really know how long they'll stay 1, 2-3 years or lifetime friends. Maybe the cosmos arranged for Mark and I to cross paths. Jesus, I sound like I'm on an Oprah show!” IN CONVERSATION WITH THE CREATORS BEHIND THE STREETLIFE PODCAST: JOHN ST. & MARK J. DAVIDSON THE PICTORIAL LIST: Hello John and Mark, firstly congratulations on the podcast! Please start off by introducing the StreetLife Podcast to us. What is it about? JOHN ST: StreetLife is a podcast on all things street photography. It’s a casual, pub-like chat where we have conversations with inspiring, creative and influential photographers from around the world. We also sprinkle in a few episodes where Mark and myself share our thoughts or opinions on particular topics on the genre street photography. MARK DAVIDSON: We felt there was a gap in the photography world for a podcast dedicated to street photography; there are a number of podcasts on photography more broadly - fashion, adventure, portrait, gear etc - but none that focused solely on street photography and we wanted to be having those conversations. We have loved hearing from street photographers about their work and what makes them tick. TPL: Tell us something about yourselves. How did you both first become interested in street photography and what keeps you drawn to it? Personally, what experience do you bring to the podcast? JS: I fell into street photography when I was forced to get a 'smart' phone for a new role at work. With that phone came a camera so I started to take pics of myself and my dog on our early morning runs as well as images of coffee (another love affair of mine) as I’d write coffee shop reviews. I then progressed into taking pics of the architecture and buildings in my home city of Adelaide which led to some frustration as people would walk into my shots! So, I thought I’d be clever and try and work those people into my shots not realising that this could be considered street/urban photography. My journey into street photography was complete when I stumbled across a Sean Tucker video when trying to learn how to make my terrible images look marginally better using apps. It was watching lots of Sean’s videos that made me take the plunge into buying a real camera. I’ve been shooting different cities around Australia for almost 4 years now. I guess I’ve stuck with street photography because it allows me to be present in the moment neither worrying about the future nor concerning myself about the past. As for what I bring to the show? Ummm…a witty charm that keeps you engaged instead of yawning and falling asleep at the wheel? I’m thinking the people listening would be able to answer that question better than myself. MD: In my day job I’m a breakfast radio producer, so from a technical standpoint I brought that experience to the podcast. As far as street photography is concerned, I still consider myself a work in progress, a novice. I have been shooting on the street for roughly three years, with COVID interrupting most of that. I’m very much still learning the craft. But I don’t feel that lack of longevity is an issue being a co-host of a street photography podcast. Each episode is very much about our guests and their journey, not so much about myself. John and I have opinions on street photography and we very much want these conversations to be relaxed chats rather than intensive interviews. But at the same time want the spotlight to be firmly on the guest. TPL: What do you hope the podcast is able to address, and what topics are you interested in pursuing? What position would you like for the podcast to occupy in this large world of photography? JS: Street podcast world domination of course! So be sure to tell your friends! Yeah, narrrr...I just want to be a conduit that gives old and new street togs out there the opportunity to listen and learn from the people we have on the show. We’ve been incredibly lucky to have spoken to some pretty heavy-hitters and some not so well known but no less talented shooters. Maybe listening to the stories about their journey will inspire our listeners to grow further themselves or perhaps stick with the genre when things aren’t going so well. The ultimate goal is to remain relevant, fun, humorous, interesting and as informative as possible and hopefully this recipe will encourage our audience to grow. MD: To be the greatest street photography podcast in the world, of course! Joking aside, I’d hope the podcast is a resource for people getting into street, as well as a forum for passionate street photographers to learn from some of the current greats of the industry. We’ve been very fortunate to have some world-class photographers on the podcast already. And I’d also like the podcast to be a vehicle for up-and-comers to get their work out there and to chat about their love of street photography. © Jesse Marlow BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Jesse Marlow © Julia Coddington BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Julia Coddington © Daniel Dunlop BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Daniel Dunlop © Betty Goh BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Betty Goh © Knox Bertie BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Knox Bertie © Prithi Dey BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Prithi Dey © Sean Tucker BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Sean Tucker TPL: Has working on the podcast so far, changed how you view street photography. If so, how? JS: I would say it would be that you need to have a purpose for doing what you’re doing. I always appreciate listening to other people’s opinions and thoughts (even those that are different to my own) on the often polarising genre that is street photography. MD: In a sense it probably has. We recently had a chat with Jesse Marlow and I was interested to hear him talk about the length of time it takes for him to finish a project. It was a good reminder that there’s no rush. It’s important to take your time. Shoot for the love of it. TPL: So far, what is the most enjoyable and fulfilling aspect of being a host of a podcast? JS: Having the opportunity to speak to so many photographers from around the world and then sharing that with others. The biggest reward is the feedback from people who took the time to listen to the podcasts and letting us know how much they’ve enjoyed listening to them. It’s very much appreciated so thanks everyone. MD: As I mentioned earlier, the access we’ve been getting has far been astonishing! It has definitely exceeded my expectations. It’s been a pure joy to have spoken to some of the world-beating photographers we’ve had on the podcast thus far, people I have long admired. Also the fact that it seems to have resonated with the photographers who listen. John and I have had incredible feedback so far. I feel lucky to be doing this. TPL: Street photography is a very complex genre, so in some sense there are many views on what street photography is. What catches your eye among the flood of images that are on offer? What kind of image is groundbreaking for you these days? JS: I like and appreciate all the different styles of street photography. I’m drawn to images that make me look and see the world differently than I, myself may see it. MD: I like something that challenges me or hits me in the guts when I’m scrolling through Instagram. I get excited when I see a photo and I don’t know how the photographer got the shot. I’d never want to impose my views or preferences of street photography on others - people can shoot whatever they like - but I do have an unapologetic bias towards candid, undoctored photography. The podcast is a resource for people getting into street, as well as a forum for passionate street photographers to learn from some of the current greats of the industry. TPL: Recently you mentioned on the podcast that you were told by a photographer that “all the good photos have already been taken”. You both disagreed with this photographer’s comment. Why? JS: I couldn’t disagree more with that somewhat cynical comment/statement. There are still future moments that have yet to be captured. None of us know whether those moments will be better or worse than those previously captured and we never will be if we aren’t there to freeze and capture time with the press of our shutter button. MD: I agree that stylistically there is a lot of repetition in street photography but I have to disagree with the notion that every good photo has already been taken. Of course that’s not true. Society is constantly changing and street photographers are going to continually document the world and way we live in it. If someone had made that statement 15 years ago, think of all the things that would never have been photographed. The iPhone for one! TPL: What photographer has made the most impact on you and that you would like to interview for the podcast? JS: Garry Winogrand, Gordon Parks and Saul Leiter. Going to be a little tricky getting any of them to agree to join us on a podcast as they’re unfortunately no longer with us. I’d really love to speak to Trent Parke, Alex Webb or Tatsuo Suzuki. MD: I’d love to interview Joel Meyerwitz and Trent Parke. I don’t think Trent does many interviews these days, so that might be tricky. Speak to Joel would be an immense privilege. TPL: Where do you discover the photographers that you want to interview? If someone wants to be on your podcast, how do they submit? What can photographers do to stand out from the crowd? JS: We started with a list of people that both Mark and I admire and love. People we interview will often bring up names of photographers that neither of us were aware of and they will get added to the list too! I’m always flicking Mark links to photographer’s accounts I’ve come across over Instagram. MD: Before we started we had a list. We’re still working our way through that list and to our wonderful surprise we’ve had around a 95% hit rate so far! We’re always on the lookout for new and exciting photographers. Hit us up with a DM or send an email to podcast.streetlife@gmail.com © Oscar Wollsten BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Oscar Wollsten © Hugh Rawson BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Hugh Rawson © B Jane Levine BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with B Jane Levine © Gustavo Minas BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Gustavo Minas © Tom Baumgaertel BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Tom Baumgaertel © Alex Munoz BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Alex Munoz © Nico Froelich BEHIND THE SCENES: Interview with Nico Froelich TPL: Do you ever feel nervous before/during a podcast? If so, what do you do to overcome any fears? What would you say to someone who wants to aspire to start a podcast? JS: You’re always a little nervous as you don’t really know the personality of the person you’re going to be talking to and they don’t know us either! MD: I find gin and tonic helps! Any nerves that either John and I have are quickly dispelled once we start the conversation. Every one we’ve spoken to has been so lovely and generous with their time. We’ve not had any awkward or tricky moments so far! TPL: Finally, what are some of your goals for the Streetlife Podcast? Where do you hope to see yourselves in five years? JS: Wow! 5 years is a long way down the line. I really hope the podcast continues to be enjoyed but most of all continue to be relevant to street photographers everywhere which then hopefully manifests itself into more people tuning in. As for advice on starting a podcast? Ummm JUST DO IT! MD: I said to John my goal is to record 50 episodes. He nearly spat out his Cornflakes when I told him that! We’re getting close to halfway there so I think that’s a realistic goal. In truth, I don’t have an end point in mind. I just know so many podcasts run out of steam after a few episodes. That hasn’t been the case with us. I think our conversations have become easier and improved as we’ve gone along. I’d love to be doing this for many years to come! I’m having a blast doing it now. It’s been incredibly rewarding. Let’s hope Street Life is kicking goals in five year’s time! ​ ​ Together both, John and Mark saw the need for a platform that would create discussions around street photography. They have worked hard cultivating a fine diverse group of street photographers to support their mission and inspire other like minded individuals out there in the industry. If you have not listened to their Podcast, give it a go, you will not be disappointed! Be careful, you may binge listen, don’t say we didn’t warn you! LISTEN TO STREETLIFE Read an interview with John >>> Read an interview with Mark >>> John's Instagram >>> Mark's Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • THE PICTORIAL LIST | EMY MAIKE

    EMY MAIKE be inspired Gallery // ARTIST'S STATEMENT // Photography is my fashion. A patient observer with a focus on adventure! LOCATION Baden Württemberg GERMANY CAMERA Fujifilm X-Series, Canon EOS 5D Mark iv CATEGORY street WEBSITE http://www.emymaike.photoshelter.com @MAIKEEMY @EMY20380696 @EMY.MAIKE FEATURES // Sta(y-ac)tion Floating Garbage

  • CHRIS SUSPECT

    CHRIS SUSPECT be inspired Gallery // ARTIST STATEMENT // I am a street and documentary photographer hailing from the Washington, DC area. My street work specializes in capturing the absurd and profound moments in the quotidian and my documentary work is the result of deep dives for years at a time into various subcultures. I have been recognized internationally by winning numerous photography awards and I have been exhibited in Miami, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Romania, Georgia, United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom. In 2019 I was a guest lecturer at StreetFoto San Francisco and Street Photo Milano. In 2018 I was named chairperson of the Focus on the Story Festival in Washington, DC. My documentary work on the underground music scene in Washington, D.C., was published as a book, Suspect Device, by Empty Stretch in 2014 and is currently held in the Leica Galerie Archives. LOCATION Washington DC USA CAMERA Leica M-P and Ricoh GR II CATEGORY documentary, street WEBSITE http://www.chrissuspect.com/ @GRATUITY_INCLUDED @CHRIS_SUSPECT @CHRIS.SUSPECT.56 FEATURES // Old Customs Gratuity Included

  • AUSFLAG | IN CONVERSATION WITH ALAN THEXTON

    INTERVIEW November 26, 2021 AUSFLAG ​ Photography by Alan Thexton Interview by Melanie Meggs As Australia embarks on a journey to reconcile its painful past and confront its present, the Australian flag has been thrust into the spotlight. On the one hand, it is seen as a symbol of national pride and identity, while on the other, it is regarded as a reminder of oppression and inequality. Photographer Alan Thexton's collection of photographs featuring the Australian flag brings to light the complex feelings that the flag evokes. Alan grew up and spent most of his early life life living in, and photographing around Melbourne, often shooting on the street. Through his candid shots, he captures moments of everyday life, giving us a glimpse into the flag’s importance, its power and its influence on individuals. His work invites us to explore what the flag means to Australians, and poses a powerful question: what does it really represent? “This series was not planned, it just seemed to evolve from my observations from around 2016 and is ongoing. The series for me is a question. When I was a child we would salute the flag and pledge allegiance to the Queen at school assembly. The flag had a certain symbolism. Growing up in the 60’s and 70’s, I saw our country change from largely a British influenced culture to a more independent and outward looking one. The way we use our flag appears to have also changed, and has even become a commercial product. When January 26th approaches, we see variations of the Australian flag plastered all over the merchandise of towels, hats, T-shirts, beer stubbies, thongs, and much much more. So I questioned myself and our society as to whether the way we use the symbolism of our flag says something about the way we have changed as a nation and who we are.” IN CONVERSATION WITH ALAN THEXTON THE PICTORIAL LIST: Alan please tell us a bit about yourself. How did you become interested in photography? ALAN THEXTON: I was born in Oakleigh in suburban Melbourne in and have lived in Melbourne most of my life. As a child I was fascinated by photographs of places and things I had not seen before and first became interested in photography in primary school. In my late teens and early 20’s photography was almost an obsession with me. Later in life as I got involved in raising a family and building a career photography became a luxury pursuit that I only occasionally engaged with. In the early 2000’s with my family largely independent I came back to photography and it has been a near constant pursuit since. Now retired from paid work and living on the Mornington Peninsula I finally have the time to devote to my photography that I have always desired. TPL: What does street photography mean to you? Describe your style. Where or how do you find inspiration? Are projects important in your street photography? AT: I have always been an observer of life. Street photography for me is an observation of life and how people relate to each other, and influence our environment. My street photography is a visual record of my observations. I prefer to think of these photographs as a collections rather than project. A project suggests a plan with a determined beginning and end. My photographs are random observations. I do not plan to pursue a certain subject. I find that certain themes or subject matter repeat in my observations and over time I gather them together and form a series of related images. There are many themes appearing in my work concurrently without a plan. TPL: What have been some of your favourite memories or moments in your photography journey? What have you personally gained from your experiences? AT: As a young man photography was a medium I used to try to make sense of the world and I suppose it is still the same now. Since starting photography a second time the world has gone digital and with this has come the online photography communities. This for me has been a huge change. When I started out I was largely photographing on my own and didn’t know anyone else that shared my interest in photographing on the street. Now I can communicate with a number of people and have met many that share my passion. TPL: When you are out photographing - how much of it is instinctual versus planned? AT: As mentioned previously I don’t plan much. I may plan to visit a certain location on a certain day but once I am there I try to empty my mind and observe. I find the more I think about what I am doing the less shots I get, if any. I prefer to wander and just see what I find. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists or photographers you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? AT: Yes many. Three that really inspired me when I stared out were Andre Kertesz, Tony Ray-Jones, and Robert Frank. And they still do. I enjoy the work of many contemporary Melbourne based photographers. There is a strong street photography community in Melbourne and I enjoy viewing their work and occasionally meeting up. ​ ​ I have always been an observer of life. Street photography for me is an observation of life and how people relate to each other, and influence our environment. TPL: What are some tips or advice you would give yourself if you started street photography all over again? AT: Believe in what you are doing and have the confidence to pursue the subject matter and style of photograph that you enjoy, not what everyone else tells you to do. TPL: Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? AT: I would like to say gear is irrelevant, but it isn’t. Street photography is easier when you are comfortable with your gear and using it is instinctive. This series has been largely shot with a Fuji X Pro1 with either an 18mm prime or 23mm prime lens. The 23mm has become my favourite. The combination of camera and lens feels a bit like using a film camera that I grew up with. The camera has some quirks but I have become comfortable using it. I have also started taking some shots with a canon EOS R which I am still learning to use. TPL: What are some of your goals as an artist or photographer? Where do you hope to see yourself in five years? AT: In five years I hope to be doing a lot of road trips photographing my way around the country and sometimes travel internationally. What sort of images will I be making? I will only know when I have made them. TPL: Are there any other special projects you are currently working on or thinking about that you would like to let everyone know about? AT: I usually have a few ideas running concurrently. Recently I dug out of my shed some old negatives from the 1970’s and early 80’s, some of which I think now have some historical value and am scanning them. I am not sure what I will do with them, maybe a book or a zine. I also recently published my first book “Smell the Sea” which is a collection of candid shots in coastal areas and is available through Blurb. TPL: "When I am not out photographing, I (like to)… AT: Like many others who have lived through a long lockdown my main priority is to get out and spend time with family. When I have not been out photographing I have spent quite a bit of time renovating our house although I rarely consider that enjoyable. I do enjoy spending time in our garden and exploring the local plant nurseries for indigenous plants, planning where to plant them, and watching them grow. ​ A final word: This interview is due to be published round the time of my wife’s birthday. So I would like to take the opportunity to thank her for her support and encouragement to pick up a digital camera and get going with photography again. ❤ Alan Thexton's photography paints a picture of the different ways in which the flag is interpreted and experienced by those who have grown up with it. His work shows us that the Australian flag has a complicated history, one that is rooted in both pride and oppression. This unique collection of photographs shines a light on the flag’s importance and its influence on Australians, raising questions that demand to be answered. As we continue to navigate this journey of reconciliation and self-discovery, Alan Thexton's work serves as a reminder of the complexity of this symbol, and encourages us to further reflect on what it means for us as individuals. Follow Alan on his project journey to discover more about the Australian flag, and how it has shaped our nation. VIEW ALAN'S PORTFOLIO Alan's website >>> Instagram >>> read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • THE PICTORIAL LIST | LELE BISSOLI

    LELE BISSOLI be inspired Gallery // ARTIST'S STATEMENT // I was born in Vercelli a little city in the northern part of Italy where I still live today. The first approach with a camera was seven years ago. At first I was fascinated by night photography and starry skies, that was until I discovered street photography. I have travelled in the last seven years and I have taken so many street shots in many cities that in my opinion are perfect for this photography genre, like New York City, Los Angeles, London but also Milan and Genova in my beloved Italy. In this series I have enjoyed reworking shots that initially didn't convince me or that I thought was 'wrong'. I have been superimposing and working them until I have reached the result I wanted, trying to create my own style and give a personality to these shots. I like photography to communicate something, to evoke a sensation already experienced. I try to select only the photos that according to and can convey something to the viewer, it works a bit like music, to tell a story or a state of mind. LOCATION Vercelli ITALY CAMERA Fujifilm XT2 , Canon Eos 70D CATEGORY street, ICM, abstract WEBSITE https://lelebissoli.portfoliobox.net/ @LELE_BISSOLI ​ ​ FEATURES // Reverberation

  • JOSÉ LUIS BLACH LEYENDA

    JOSÉ LUIS BLACH LEYENDA be inspired Gallery // ARTIST STATEMENT // I am an autodidact living in The Netherlands. A few years ago I started photography using the Fujifilm X system seeking to capture urban scenes to improve my basic skills and learn the art of photography. Out of curiosity and a bit of nostalgia for my father in his young years, I did have an analog Canon and used a projector to see the film results. My Tokyo trip ignited my passion. Then I switched to the Fujifilm X system. I am still learning. LOCATION NETHERLANDS CAMERA Fujifilm X - pro 1 CATEGORY urban, architecture, street ​ @BLACH_LEYENDA.J.L ​ ​ FEATURES // Netherlands Nostalgia

  • TELLING STORIES | IN CONVERSATION WITH MELITA VANGELATOU

    INTERVIEW November 20, 2020 TELLING STORIES ​ Photography by Melita Vangelatou Interview by Karin Svadlenak Gomez Greek photographer Melita Vangelatou was born in Alexandria and has moved around the world throughout her life. Currently based in Casablanca, Morocco, she enjoys documenting the cultures and lives of people around her, immersing herself in her environment on foot and by bicycle. She usually likes to get to know her subjects before taking their picture, and then prefers candid shots that respect her subjects. She wants to capture emotions and tell stories with her photography. Melita's work has been exhibited internationally and been published in photobooks. She spoke to us about what drives her passion for photography and how she approaches it. “Every country I have lived in had something different to offer, and I tried to get to know it through observing its customs and its people and studying its history. I feel privileged and enriched to have had this experience. Even though there is an emotional price to pay, I feel that what you gain far outweighs it. I now live in Morocco, which is the country I have lived longest in and I feel a close affinity to.” IN CONVERSATION WITH MELITA VANGELATOU THE PICTORIAL LIST: Melita please tell us about yourself. How did you become interested in photography? MELITA VANGELATOU: I am Greek, born and raised in Alexandria. My parents moved to Greece when I was a teenager and that is where I later met my husband, who is Greek, born and raised in Africa. Together we have lived in different countries and travelled extensively. Ever since I can remember I have loved photography. When we were in school, I used my brother's cameras, first a Yashica and then a Canon. He also had a darkroom in our basement where we would go and print. Later on in my life, after I studied photography, I had my own fully equipped darkroom. In school I was the class photographer. When I got married, my family, and my friends knew that I always had my camera with me. I loved taking family pictures, since it was a subject readily available, but at the same time pictures of the places where we lived and visited. TPL: Do you have a favourite quote or saying that especially resonates with you? MV: One quote that really resonates with me is Alfred Eisenstaedt’s: “It is more important to click with people than to click the shutter.” I always like to speak to people, to get to know them, to understand what they are doing and why and then to take a picture. I never take pictures that I feel will hurt people, even if I think that it is the best picture. On the island of Cephalonia, where I am right now, I love to take photos of fishermen. I spend time around them, asking them where they go fishing, if they go every day, year round, if they have a family and how hard it is. I know their names and they know mine, and this way they just ignore my camera when I am around them. I always end up by buying fish too! This island is famous for its Loggerhead turtles. I like following the researchers who walk around the island observing the turtles, taking them out of the water to measure them, inspect them and tag them. The other quote I like is Robert Kappa’s: "If your pictures are not good enough you are not close enough." The lens I have always used and still do is a 75 mm. I never use long telephotos because I always like getting close to my subject. There are endless quotes that I like and think about when I photograph, like Ansel Adams: "A good photograph is knowing where to stand." TPL: Where do you find your inspiration? Do you have a favourite place to photograph? MV: I like to shoot on the street, where there is a lot going on, so I find inspiration. I just shoot haphazardly in the beginning, and then I slowly get to know the country, and I look for specific things. In Morocco, for example I know my favourite places to shoot. I like shooting around the 'hammams' or the traditional bakers or in markets where there is a lot of activity. TPL: Tell us about your project 'Casablanca' you submitted to us. MV: Casablanca is where I live for most of the year, so obviously I am very interested in the city and its people. In order to be able to communicate with the people and understand them I start by learning the language. The inhabitants of Casablanca, the 'Casaoui' are very impressed and like it very much when you speak their language because it is a language spoken only in Morocco and very few foreigners try to master it. By speaking the language I break the first barrier. I can then move a step further and try understanding their traditions and customs. The fact that the weather is mild year round and that all activities take place out of doors is an extra bonus for me. The project 'Casablanca' is a very long one because I am studying a very complicated subject. So with the pandemic I narrowed down that project a bit to focus on 'Casablanca During the Pandemic'. By studying the 'Casaoui' during this state of lockdown, I could see more facets of their behavior, like how much they protect their children and how once the lockdown ended and the city was in a 'state of emergency' the rules had to be enforced because nobody observed them. TPL: These days, when we see scenes of people gathering together, the fear of the Covid-19 pandemic is always present in our minds. In what way are people in Morocco affected by it, and how did it affect your photography? MV: During lockdown everyone in Casablanca behaved and did exactly as they were told. Often there were police cars going around enforcing the rules primarily in working class districts and in shantytowns because people there live in the streets. They keep their doors open, sometimes covering them with a cloth so that they can go in and out easily. When lockdown ended, it was as though people were free to do whatever they wanted. The carts were out again selling goods and people swarmed around them, and gathered on the beaches, making things dangerous again. I still went out to photograph wearing a mask, but it became harder as I had to keep my distance from others. The fact that I am always on my bike with my camera makes it easier for me to take pictures. When I locate an area with interesting things happening, I just tie up my bike and walk around. TPL: What do you want to express through your photography? And what are some of the elements you always try to include in your photographs? MV: I always include people in my photography. I like capturing emotions and I like photos that tell a story. People who see my photos often tell me that they enjoy 'travelling' with me through my stories. I observe people, and when I foresee that something interesting is about to happen, I follow them. The anticipation excites me, and I don’t want them to see me for fear that my presence will make them change their behaviour. It is more important to click with people than to click the shutter. - Alfred Eisenstaedt TPL: Do you have a concept in mind of what you want to shoot, or do you let the images just 'come to you', or is it a combination of both? MV: It is both. Sometimes I just take my camera and go out on the street hoping to find something that will grab my attention and I always do. When I am travelling somewhere I have a very general concept in mind, which is to capture the life there, but I also have sub-concepts about very specific aspects of the people’s lives. I am very interested in weddings and religious festivities and how they are celebrated in different countries. In Morocco, for example, the application of 'henna', which is a reddish brown dye used to decorate the body, is very important and is used to mark different stages in a woman’s life. One day I learned that a young girl that I knew would have henna designs applied to her hands and feet to celebrate the fact that she would be going to the notary public to sign her marriage certificate, in other words to get married. I accompanied her, together with her mother and grandmother that day, and I also was invited to her wedding celebration, where again I photographed the much more grandiose henna ceremony there. I am now waiting to photograph the henna ceremony at the birth of her child. TPL: Do you have any favourite artists you would like to share with us, and the reason for their significance? MV: The photographers that I really admire are Henri Cartier-Bresson, Fan Ho, Robert Doisneau and Constantine Manos, a Greek photographer living in the United States. I look at their photography and hope to be influenced by their great style. I know that for them, framing and timing was extremely important, and for me these two elements are the essence of photography. TPL: Does the equipment you use help you in achieving your vision in your photography? What camera do you use? Do you have a preferred lens/focal length? MV: My first film camera was a small, manual Canon with a 75mm lens. Many years after I acquired two medium format Mamiya, where I added a panoramic adaptor on one, which gave me a format that few photographers used, so it was interesting. Still, every ten shots I had to change the film and I soon realised that these cameras were the worst choice for me. Apart from being bulky they slowed my street photography so much that I missed many shots. My brother offered me my first digital Canon and that is what drove me to stop using film and go into digital photography. In the beginning I found the images too sharp. Now I would never switch back to film. One day I told my husband that my dream had always been to own a Leica. He got me my first one for my birthday and from then on I have used only Leica cameras. The first thing I like about them is their size. Photographing in a country like Morocco, where people like to keep their privacy is easier with such an inconspicuous camera. Also it is simple and doesn’t have all the frills that other cameras possess, but that I never use. Of course the lenses have the best image quality and finally it is less bulky for when I am travelling. The lens I always use is a 75mm, that was actually always my preferred lens, which helps me in street photography as I don’t have to get extremely close to people. TPL: Have you been involved in the arts before or other than photography? MV: Photography was always my passion. I like all forms of art but have never been involved in any. TPL: What are some of your goals as an artist? Where do you see yourself or hope to see yourself in five years? MV: My goals are to continue exhibiting, I prefer museums, but there are other interesting venues too, and to make photography books. That is what I love doing and that is what I want to keep doing. I would also enjoy talking about photography and communicating my ideas, but I haven't seriously thought about where and how. TPL: "When I am not out photographing, I like to... MV: When I am not actually taking pictures there are still so many things around photography that I like doing. I read and look at photography and art books, I visit exhibitions and museums and also make photography books, both family and travel. I always liked sports and was a maniac tennis player. I have for some reason lost interest in tennis, but I now scuba dive, swim and bike wherever I have to go, always with my Jack Russell Zippy. This is my major form of exercise because in the countries where I live I can do it all year round. My family and extended family are very important to me and I love spending time with them." Melita Vangelatou is an incredible photographer whose passion for capturing emotions and telling stories shines in her work. Her unique approach to photography is to get to know her subjects before taking their picture, and then to capture candid shots that honor her subjects. Melita's work has been exhibited around the world and featured in several photobooks. We encourage you to view more of Melita's work using the links below. VIEW MELITA'S PORTFOLIO Read CASABLANCA NOW by Melita >>> Melita's instagram >>> read more interviews >>> EPHEMERAL RHYTHMS Edwin Carungay's "Boardwalk Diary" captures the vibrant, raw essence of life at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk, celebrating the diverse and unfiltered humanity that converges along California's iconic coastline. THE ART OF SELF Mia Depaola's photography inspires self-awareness, capturing the beauty of the human spirit and immortalizing it through her insightful lens. TRUE LIFE IMPRESSIONS Matthias Godde's meticulously curates photographs that blend observation with introspection, resonating with profound emotional depth and infused with wit, irony, and occasional absurdity. NATURE KNOWS NO PAUSE Through her photographs Ann Petruckevitch captures the resilience of nature amidst the challenges of climate change, serving as a reflection on humanity’s relationship with the natural world. URBAN ECHOES Through his project “Echo,” Rowell B. Timoteo extends an invitation to explore the vibrant streets of San Fernando, where his lens captures the nuanced interplay of light, shadow, and human emotion. COLORS OF A GREY CITY In Rafa Rojas' photography project, we witness the convergence of passion and purpose, a visual ode to the city of São Paulo he calls home. PRIMAL INSTINCT Tara Sellios invites us to explore the interplay of life and death, of decay and beauty, and to find within that juxtaposition a reflection of our own existential journey. OPPORTUNITIES The Pictorial List partners with International Photography Awards, enhancing resources for photographers worldwide. We interview IPA founder Hossein Farmani, a visionary in photography. MINIMALIST REVERIE Nazanin Davari's minimalist style invites you to an imaginative world where silence and freedom converge, painting unseen beauty with her lens. THE AUTHENTIC GAZE: THE DON'T SMILE PROJECT Delve into the visual anthology of urban youth, a collection of moments where the mundane transcends into the profound, sparked by the click of Amy Horowitz's camera. BLACK AND WHITE WITH A THREAD OF RED Valeria Cunha is fascinated by the street, using it as inspiration to find structure amidst the confusion. Her photography creates intriguing connections and relationships through dynamic compositions that convey emotion. TALES OF A CITY With a passion for exploring the world through his camera lens, Seigar brings a unique perspective to his art, infused with reflections, colors, and icons. 18 >> 20 Elsa Arrais composed a simultaneously artistic, emotional, poetic and imagery portrait of her city in a predetermined period of time. WOMEN WARRIORS OF AZERBAIJAN Fidan Nazimqizi is aware of distinct challenges the women in her community are confronted with on a daily basis. Their struggles have become a focus for her photography. SHOOT NEW YORK CITY Leanne Staples is a passionate and driven street photographer whose honest perspective of city life captures both its simplicity and complexity. TRANSTEMPORAL Russell Cobb is an incredible photographer and storyteller who offers viewers a chance to step into the past and explore the nuances of culture and history. A LOVE SONG TO THE AMERICAN WEST We have the pleasure of seeing and hearing the visual stories created between photographer, Ross Taylor and musician, Russick Smith. As the wind sweeps through the landscapes the notes of a cello fill every void. JESSE'S STORY Jesse’s story becomes a timeless testament of an unconventional and successful fighter. Andrée Thorpe invites us to reflect on the inspiring journey of this brave individual. WALKING BUENOS AIRES We take a deep dive into the journey of Alex Gottfried Bonder - an artist who has spent many years uncovering the soul of Buenos Aires through street photography. UNDER THE COVERS WITH AMERICAN BEDROOM Barbara Peacock, opens the door to her subjects' bedroom, revealing their intimate thoughts and emotions. Discover the confidence and trust shared between the photographer and subject for an authentic and inspiring experience.

  • JULES CARR

    JULES CARR be inspired Gallery // ARTIST STATEMENT // My lifelong interest in photography has really sparked into a passion in the last couple of years. Changes in my life caused me to have more of an emotional connection with the world around me, and I started to notice the changing urban landscape, and how the ordinary and mundane can be quite extraordinary. I quickly upgraded from a smartphone to a camera, and then a better camera (which I take with me everywhere, just in case!). I am really drawn to shooting at night, particularly urban landscapes with a cinematic atmosphere, but I am nowhere near where I want to be yet. It's a constant process of experimenting and trying to improve, and searching for that elusive shot. LOCATION Surrey ENGLAND CAMERA Sony a7ii CATEGORY urban landscape, street WEBSITE http://www.julescarrphotography.com @JULESCARRPHOTOGRAPHY ​ ​ FEATURES // After Dark

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